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Old 02-02-2014, 06:25 AM   #31
Peter Knutsen
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Default Re: [LTC3] Textile Crops and Beekeeping

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Originally Posted by whswhs View Post
Papyrus only works for paper in desert climates. Apparently if you use it in a damp climate it takes up water and goes all slimy fairly quickly.
So moving a papyrus scroll from dry Egypt to damp Europe is a really bad idea?
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:59 AM   #32
roguebfl
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Default Re: [LTC3] Textile Crops and Beekeeping

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Originally Posted by Turhan's Bey Company View Post
Nope. Between kitchen gardens, deliberately maintained hedgerows and other semi-wild lands, and significant acreage kept fallow (which means, as a practical matter, grasses and weeds), the landscape was far from mono-cropped even if people only grew one kind of grain.
People generally did not grow only one type of grain, grown two types was a good way to hedge your bets if one fails that season. It's also why mixed grain breads were so traditional ans the grains were grown mixed together no not bothered to be sorted.
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Old 02-02-2014, 09:19 AM   #33
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Default Re: [LTC3] Textile Crops and Beekeeping

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Originally Posted by whswhs View Post
Papyrus only works for paper in desert climates. Apparently if you use it in a damp climate it takes up water and goes all slimy fairly quickly.
Water uptake is actually a general problem for paper, particularly hand made papers that haven't been somehow compacted. The enthusiasm plant cellulose fibers pick up water is one of the problems sizings (and in modern papers, coatings) are in there to counteract.

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If I recall correctly, the book on the Chinese printing industry that I read while researching mentioned the use of bamboo as a fiber source for cheap paper.
Apparently you can do this by controlled rotting - not quite the same process used to extract fibers from flax, but same general idea.
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