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Old 07-16-2009, 02:28 AM   #1
Icelander
 
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Default Medieval Horse Types and Traits

The rules for horses in the Basic Set are a bit biased towards modern horse sizes and lack a certain level of detail when it comes to modifying the basic stats. As such, I've used the following in my home campaign:

Horse Traits


Some horse traits are inherited and others are the result of training. Both are treated the same for game purposes, but a GM may restrict some of them to horses with bloodlines that support them. If the GM allows a given trait to be trainable, the construction rules are a good place to start to determine the time. If the result seems implausible, it should be adjusted, as horses differ greatly and what one might learn in days another will take years to assimilate.

Traits sharing the same name are levelled and incompatible with each other. A GM may rule that other traits are mutually exclusive or naturally come together. For example, a gelding will rarely be aggressive enough for high Brawling scores and horses with many positive traits will tend to have Styling (see Low-Tech/High-Tech) as equestrians appreciate many aesthetic features that correlate with good performance. In addition, fast and nimble horses seldom go past a certain size and the strongest horses seldom have good endurance.

A very good horse that can be bred will also carry a premium over and above its worth as a mount. This is dependent on many factors, but in general, the prices below assume a mare or a gelding. A stallion with sought-after characteristics will be at least three times the price and often ten times it or more. The GM is within his rights to apply a CF for this factor to any stallion and even some mares.

By contrast, some breeds, even some very hearty and tough ones, have been despised by those rich enough to pay high prices. This is particularly likely for breeds that are slightly smaller than average, even though they may be equally strong as larger horses. Such a horse might only cost half of the final price determined by his qualities, but his progeny would be hard to sell and reaction modifiers would certainly apply for anyone riding such a horse when his social status would demand a more suitable mount.

The Mount skill of different types will be orientated towards very different things. A palfrey prioritised a smooth gait, while chargers must be steady, aggressive and capable of holding formation with other horses. To simulate this, the GM may wish to impose familiarity penalties for horses being used for different tasks than those they are trained for. Very specialised horses might even have an Optional Specialisation on their Mount skill, at no change to cost.

Some breeds of horses may also be fashionable or in great demand due to certain economic conditions. Handle this with the rules for Luxury pricing. Note that both destriers and jennets would be subject to this rule at various times during the medieval period.

Conditioning: This trait is partly the result of bloodline and partly the result of good feed and regular exercise. It grants Fit and adds a +3 CF.

Superb Conditioning: Very few horses are capable of attaining such a fine pitch of physical perfection, but those which can are sought after for hunting, war and travel. Grants Very Fit and adds +9 CF.

Dressage: Training in responding to a rider’s commands beyond the minimum required to serve as a pack animal. Gives Mount skill at DX+2. This training is assumed for most riding horses, but if added to a template which does not have it, add +0.5 CF.

Improved Dressage: More specific training for the role a horse fills. Familiarity penalties may apply when used outside this speciality. Gives Mount skill at DX+3 or +1 to Mount skill if it is already at that level or higher. Adds +1 CF.

Advanced Dressage: A horse with this level of training can function as a noble’s steed. Grants Mount skill at DX+4 or +2 to Mount skill, whichever is higher. Adds +2 CF. Further levels are possible, at +2 CF per +1 to skill.

Fast: Some horses are faster than others. For a creature bred for travel, this is a valuable trait. Gives +1 Move and adds +1 CF.

Very Fast: The fastest horses command astronomical prices. Few large horses are this fast and most breeds that produce such speedy mounts are sought after and have Styling or Luxury pricing in addition to the base modifier. Adds +2 Move and +3 CF.

Graceful: An agile and sure-footed horse. Adds +1 DX. +3 CF.

Very Graceful: The picture of equine grace. Grants +2 DX and adds +9 CF.

Jumping: A horse can be taught to jump hedges and obstacles. A basic facility with jumping is assumed to be a part of the training of normal riding horses, but some mounts are unusually good jumpers. Grants Jumping at DX+1. Adds +0.5 CF.

Improved Jumping: Hunters must often negotiate bad terrain and jump obstacles that suddenly appear. This grants Jumping at DX+2 and adds +1 CF.

Advanced Jumping: Jumping horses can be a flashy demonstration of skill and horse quality as well as a practical skill. Grants Jumping at DX+3 and adds +2 CF. Further levels are possible, with each +1 to skill adding +2 CF.

Robust: A healthy horse, with strong bones and good structure. Gives +1 HT. +1 CF.

Very Robust: An extremely tough horse, the kind which can stand any discomfort and difficulty. Gives +2 HT and adds +3 CF.

Course Running: Training for horse racing, over short and medium distances. Gives Running (Optional Speciality: Racing) at HT+1. Roll against the speciality when using Contests of Running skill to determine the winner of a race. Adds +0.5 CF.

Improved Course Running: Typical for a racing horse that competes in series races. Grants Running (Optional Speciality: Racing) at HT+2. CF +1.

Advanced Course Running: The finest racing horses might race in front of high nobility and royalty and fortunes might change hands depending on their form. Usually only fast horses are chosen for such extensive race training. Grants Running (Optional Speciality: Racing) at HT+3. CF +2. Further levels are possible, at +2 CF per +1 to skill.

Endurance Running: Training for long distance runs. Gives Running (Optional Speciality: Endurance Running) at HT+1. Roll against the speciality when using Running in place of HT when determining Fatigue loss. +0.5 CF.

Improved Endurance Running: Hunters are often trained for long and hard riding. This gives Running (Optional Speciality: Endurance Running) at HT+2. +1 CF.

Advanced Endurance Running: Some horses can run for hours without tiring. This trait is often combined with Conditioning for exceptional hunters and messenger horses. Gives Running (Optional Speciality: Endurance Running) at HT+3. Adds +2 CF. Further levels are possible, with each +1 to skill giving +2 CF.

Stamina: Usually a factor of breed and bloodline rather than training, this horse has better wind than others. Gives a +1 to FP and adds +0.25 CF.

Good Stamina: A very good endurance horse, with an efficient gait and good lung capacity. Adds +2 FP. +0.5 CF.

Tireless Stamina: Horses with this kind of constitution are exceptionally rare and extremely sought after. Gives +3 FP and adds +1 CF.

Strong Specimen: Large or strong horses have always been sought after. This adds about +10% (in whatever combination the GM deems plausible) to the horse’s ST or Lifting ST. Usually, but not always, this also means a higher weight and therefore greater feed requirements. It adds +1 CF.

Very Strong Specimen: The very strongest horses carry a large premium, if only for their rarity. Very Strong Specimen adds up to +20% (in whatever combination the GM deems plausible) to the horse’s ST or Lifting ST and such horses are always larger than normal examples of their type. It adds +3 CF.

Basic War Training: Enough exposure to noise and shocks for a horse to be unlikely to bolt during the confusion of battle. Also includes familiarity with most cavalry drills used by the trainer’s culture. Gives Fearlessness 2. Adds +0.5 CF.

War Training: Aggressive horses can be trained to not only bear their riders in battle, but to attack the foe themselves with kicks and bites. Grants +1 Will; Combat Reflexes instead of Fearlessness 2; +1 to Mount skill and adds Brawling skill at DX+1. At the GM’s option, spirited horses can have higher Brawling scores, but usually have Bad Temper to match. Adds +1 CF.

Advanced War Training: A knight’s destrier might be trained for years and enjoy long experience of warfare. An example of the kind of benefit this might yield is Advanced War Training. It grants +1 Will; Combat Reflexes; Fearlessness 2; +2 to Mount skill and Brawling at DX+2 or higher. It adds +3 CF.
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Last edited by Icelander; 07-17-2009 at 08:36 PM.
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Old 07-16-2009, 03:00 AM   #2
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Default Horse Types

Screwbald
ST: 17; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 10.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5; Dodge: 8; Move: 6.
SM +1 (2 hexes); 700 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 12); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +1; Weak Bite.
Cost: $500

A small horse that can be ridden by a small man or someone with little baggage.

Sumpter
ST: 19; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 11.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5; Dodge: 8; Move: 6.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 800-900 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 0.5 (Ground Speed 9); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +2; Weak Bite.
Cost: $750

A typical pack horse and may also be used to represent any kind of working horse.

Hackney
ST: 19; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 11.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5; Dodge: 8; Move: 6.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 750-850 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 12); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +1; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount -11.
Cost: $1,200

The typical saddle horse would be a hackney. Higher quality ones might be called rouncies in some periods.

Draught horse
ST: 21; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5; Dodge: 8; Move: 6.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1300-1500 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 12); Hooves; Increased HP +2; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +2; Lifting ST +2 (Dragging Only -60%); Weak Bite.
Cost: $2,000

A large and strong horse that can do hard work around a farm. Contrary to popular belief, such horses are not necessarily good at carrying weight, as opposed to dragging it.

Palfrey
ST: 19; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 11.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5; Dodge: 8; Move: 7.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 800 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 14); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +1; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount (Optional Specialisation: Smooth Gait) -14/12.
Cost: $4,200 (Basic Cost $1,400).

This represents a basic palfrey or riding horse, the minimum quality a person of high birth could be seen riding. What differentiates it from a rouncey or hackney is not just quality, but also the signature gait, which is a more comfortable form of locomotion than the trot or gallop, if not as fast. This example includes Advanced Dressage (+2 CF). Many palfreys would have higher Mount skill, Styling, higher Move or improved Lifting ST and consequently would be much more expensive.

Jennet
ST: 18; DX: 10; IQ: 3; HT: 11.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 8.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 700 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +1; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount (Optional Specialisation: Smooth Gait) -15/13.
Cost: $6,000 (Basic Cost $2,000).

The jennet, like the palfrey, would usually be a mount for nobility and the rich. This example includes Advanced Dressage (+2 CF). The jennet came from Spain and for a long time, only black jennets were fashionable. This type was often identified with ladies, since they gave such a smooth ride, but they were fast and strong enough for the Spanish to have used them as light cavalry mounts.

Hobby
ST: 18; DX: 10; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.5; Dodge: 9; Move: 8.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 750 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Fearlessness +2; Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +2; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount -12.
Cost: $3,000 (Basic Cost $2,000).

Like many medieval horses, the hobby would be classified as a pony today. It was the mount of the hobelar, a light cavalryman of Ireland and Scotland, and was reckoned marvellous fast and strong for its size. This example includes Basic War Training for +0.5 CF.

Garron
ST: 19; DX: 10; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.5; Dodge: 8; Move: 7.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 900 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 14); Hooves; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Lifting ST +2; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount -12.
Cost: $1,800.

The despised garron stood low from the ground, but was strongly built. It was nimble enough to be useful on rough roads where more fashionable horses could not go and strong enough to carry most men. The lack of cachet associated with them and low labour and feed requirements of breeding them meant that they were often available at even lower prices than this, despite their many advantages in mountainous terrain. Any noble riding a garron in front of his peers without a very good reason, though, risks a reaction modifier of -1 or worse.

Rouncey
ST: 20; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 10; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 8.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 900-1000 lbs.

Traits: Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Fearlessness +2; Hooves; Lifting ST +1; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Mount -11.
Cost: $2,700 (Basic Cost $1,800).

The better class of hackneys might also be referred to as rouncies, but this horse is a trained warhorse, albeit one more fitting for a squire than a knight. As such, the price includes +0.5 CF for Basic War Training.

Courser
ST: 21; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 8.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1000-1100 lbs.

Traits: Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Hooves; Lifting ST +1; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -10; Mount -12.
Cost: $4,000 (Basic Cost $2,000).

The most common warhorse, even for knights, during the medieval period. The courser is built much like a modern-day hunter. The price includes +1 CF for War Training.

Hunting Courser
ST: 21; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 9.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1000 lbs.

Traits: Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 18); Fit; Hooves; Lifting ST +1; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -10; Jumping -12; Mount -14; Running -13.
Cost: $27,000 (Basic Cost $2,000).

An example of an expensive courser, this warm-blooded horse is a very fast hunter that can also be used for warfare. In addition to war training (+1 CF), it has Styling +2 (CF +3), Fast (+1 CF) Endurance Running (+0.5 CF), Advanced Dressage (+2 CF), Advanced Jumping (+2 CF) and Conditioning (+3 CF).

Destrier
ST: 22; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 7.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1200-1300 lbs.

Traits: Bad Temper (12); Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 14); Hooves; Lifting ST +2; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -12; Mount -12.
Cost: $5,000 (Basic Cost $2,500).

This is a very utilitarian destrier, most likely considered passť by a high Status character’s peers. This might be due to some flaw in appearance or an unfashionable breed. It includes a +1 CF for War Training, but a good destrier should also include Styling and would likely be better trained.

Knight’s Destrier
ST: 22; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 8.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1200 lbs.

Traits: Bad Temper (12); Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Fearlessness 2; Hooves; Lifting ST +2; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -12; Mount -13.
Cost: $25,000 (Basic Cost: $2,500).

An example of a successful knight’s destrier, this horse stands between 15-16 hands tall and despite its formidable strength; it is surprisingly agile and quick. It includes a +3 CF for Advanced War Training as well as Styling +1 (+1 CF) and Fast (+1 CF). The price is also boosted by +4 CF for being a breedable stallion of a desirable type.

Great Destrier
ST: 23; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 7.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1600 lbs.

Traits: Bad Temper (12); Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 14); Hooves; Lifting ST +3; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -12; Mount -12.
Cost: $12,500 (Basic Cost $2,500).

Huge horses such as this were actually not very common as warhorses in the medieval era. A very large man, however, might be unable to comfortably ride a smaller destrier while wearing full armour. This horse does not stand much more than 16 hands tall, but is broad-chested and muscular. The cost includes a +1 CF for War Training as well as Styling +1 (+1 CF) and Strong Specimen (+1 CF). It also includes a +2 CF boost for being a breedable stallion.
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Last edited by Icelander; 09-27-2012 at 01:05 AM.
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Old 07-16-2009, 04:17 AM   #3
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Default Re: Medieval Horse Types and Traits

I'm particularly looking for input on whether the prices look right or if any need tweaking.
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Old 07-16-2009, 04:51 AM   #4
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Default Re: Medieval Horse Types and Traits

My want to include these in my game are only hampered by how little I know on the subject of horses. Very well written though.
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Old 07-16-2009, 08:00 AM   #5
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Default Re: Horse Types

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icelander View Post
Great Destrier
ST: 23; DX: 9; IQ: 3; HT: 12.
Will: 11; Per: 12; Speed: 5.25; Dodge: 9; Move: 7.
SM +1 (3 hexes); 1600 lbs.

Traits: Bad Temper (12); Combat Reflexes; Domestic Animal; Enhanced Move 1 (Ground Speed 16); Hooves; Lifting ST +3; Peripheral Vision; Quadruped; Weak Bite.
Skills: Brawling -12; Mount -12.
Cost: $16,000 (Basic Cost $4,000).

Huge horses such as this were actually not very common as warhorses in the medieval era. A very large man, however, might be unable to comfortably ride a smaller destrier while wearing full armour. This horse does not stand much more than 16 hands tall, but is broad-chested and muscular. The cost includes a +1 CF for War Training as well as Styling +1 (+1 CF) and Strong Specimen (+1 CF).
This has me a bit perplexed. Are you replacing the Heavy Warhorse on B460? Your Great Destrier is much more expensive, but not clearly 'better' in all ways. Wouldn't you start with the Heavy Warhorse and work your way up from there for that sort of horse?
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:18 AM   #6
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Default Re: Horse Types

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kazander View Post
This has me a bit perplexed. Are you replacing the Heavy Warhorse on B460? Your Great Destrier is much more expensive, but not clearly 'better' in all ways. Wouldn't you start with the Heavy Warhorse and work your way up from there for that sort of horse?
The Heavy Warhorse is, as far as I know, not a real animal and it is certainly not a medieval animal. It also, unaccountably, doesn't cost enough. Since war training doubles price in the Basic Set, the price appears to be only $2,500 for the horse itself, which makes little sense.

I tried to retain Basic Set stats, but its very anachronistic for medieval horses to have so little difference between the types. A basic saddle horse being 1,200 and a destrier being 2,500 before war training is not realistic. Not to mention that the 1,900 lbs. destrier flies in the face of scholarship.
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Old 07-16-2009, 10:01 AM   #7
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Default Re: Medieval Horse Types and Traits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blood Legend View Post
My want to include these in my game are only hampered by how little I know on the subject of horses. Very well written though.
That's what sourcebooks are for. It shouldn't take much effort to produce a book that will allow typical GMs, even ones who've never seen a horse, to present mounts as something else than anachronistic cars in their campaigns.

I know that each type needs a longer flavour text and rules for upkeep and care are missing. I direct you to the Pyramid article Horse Sense by a Mr. Mortimer for both, with my 4e stats replacing the 3e stats in the article. It's even a free article, I think, and should have survived the Pyramid changes.
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Old 07-16-2009, 12:27 PM   #8
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Default Re: Medieval Horse Types and Traits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icelander View Post
I know that each type needs a longer flavour text and rules for upkeep and care are missing. I direct you to the Pyramid article Horse Sense by a Mr. Mortimer for both, with my 4e stats replacing the 3e stats in the article. It's even a free article, I think, and should have survived the Pyramid changes.
Indeed, it is free: Horse Sense.
For those that have and prefer the downloaded archives, it's 2004/0603.html.

I'll most definitely be using these in my campaigns - thank you, Icelander!
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Old 07-16-2009, 12:44 PM   #9
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Default Re: Medieval Horse Types and Traits

Thanks for these stats, Icelander. I expect they'll prove very useful.

Edit: Just a note regarding the Horse Sense article where it suggests --

Quote:
In GURPS, the skill of the farrier is covered by Blacksmith (p. B53), but many also have the Veterinary skill (p. B47) with a horse specialization.
Personally, I would take a different approach using a routine Blacksmith roll to cover making the shoe, and a non-routine Animal Handling (Equine) roll for actually shoeing the beast.

Last edited by Figleaf23; 07-16-2009 at 12:53 PM.
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Old 07-16-2009, 01:26 PM   #10
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Default Re: Horse Types

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icelander View Post
Screwbald

A small horse that can be ridden by a small man or someone with little baggage.
FWIW, screwbald is a coloration, not a breed or type of horse. A piebald horse is blotched black and white, while a skewbald(screwbald) horse is blotched chestnut and white.
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