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Old 08-26-2021, 10:35 AM   #1
hal
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Buffalo, New York
Default Vectored thrust vs Straight Thrust

Hello Folks,
Thought I'd ask a simple question...

Let's say for the sake of argument, you dig in and research what it takes to build a TL 10 thruster module. You obey all of the rules listed in GURPS TRAVELLER (or GURPS CLASSIC TRAVELLER if using PDF). But instead of building the module with vectored thrust, you build it as a straight thrust engine.

OK, so what you ask? What if you could build straight thrust engine modules that could provide 2G's thrust and also include sufficient standard thrusters to provide 2G's of thrust. As long as you thrust straight ahead, you can do 4 Gs. If you need to use Vectored Thrust, you need to utilize only 2 G's thrust.

So the new question becomes this:

If you use a 2 G vectored thrust to rotate your ship such that you're now 180 degress from your last built up vector of thrust - how long would it take at 2 G's to turn a 200 dTon hull around 180 degrees before you can use 4 G of thrust in opposition to your original vector?

What if I could get to 2G thrust vectored, and 4 G thrust unvectored - for a total thrust of 6 Gs. Would it really function any more differently than if it were built with nothing but vectored thrust modules?

Just curious to hear other's thoughts.

Hal
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