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Old 06-02-2024, 11:20 PM   #801
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Default Re: Exotic Governmental/Legal Systems

Another modification to a general Westminster-type parliamentary system occurs to me: imagine a setting where someone in the general public can start a petition, and if it gets enough signatures, it triggers an election whether the ruling party or coalition wants one or not.

It would probably require a very large number of signatures, but I could imagine a parliamentary system with some such feature.
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Old 06-03-2024, 06:38 AM   #802
TGLS
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Default Re: Exotic Governmental/Legal Systems

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Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Another modification to a general Westminster-type parliamentary system occurs to me: imagine a setting where someone in the general public can start a petition, and if it gets enough signatures, it triggers an election whether the ruling party or coalition wants one or not.

It would probably require a very large number of signatures, but I could imagine a parliamentary system with some such feature.
That's not entirely out there; apparently some German states allow for the dissolution of state parliaments by petition when elections would not normally be scheduled. In some Canadian provincial parliaments and in British Parliament* petitions can trigger by-elections for specific MPs.

*British recall petitions are initiated when an MP is found to commit certain misconduct, not whenever.
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Old 06-06-2024, 07:24 PM   #803
malloyd
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Default Re: Exotic Governmental/Legal Systems

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Originally Posted by TGLS View Post
That's not entirely out there; apparently some German states allow for the dissolution of state parliaments by petition when elections would not normally be scheduled. In some Canadian provincial parliaments and in British Parliament* petitions can trigger by-elections for specific MPs.

*British recall petitions are initiated when an MP is found to commit certain misconduct, not whenever.
I think many parliamentary states also retain the formal authority of the head of state to dissolve the parliament. He never does mind you (at least in the West, I'm not so sure about the Supreme Leader of Iran), and while you can usually petition him for anything you like, he's under no obligation to grant anything. Still, in principle it could happen, and once it does once, suddenly it's an option on the table all the time.

If 50% of the voters of Canada or the UK actually signed a petition and delivered it to King Charles asking him to dissolve the government, what [would] he do? I dunno. I suspect the real answer is as it got close to looking like a majority, he'd call in the PM and politely ask him to resign or call an election "voluntarily" and not make this into a constitutional crisis likely to establish an actual precedent.
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Old 06-06-2024, 11:40 PM   #804
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Default Re: Exotic Governmental/Legal Systems

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I think many parliamentary states also retain the formal authority of the head of state to dissolve the parliament. He never does mind you (at least in the West, I'm not so sure about the Supreme Leader of Iran), and while you can usually petition him for anything you like, he's under no obligation to grant anything. Still, in principle it could happen, and once it does once, suddenly it's an option on the table all the time.

If 50% of the voters of Canada or the UK actually signed a petition and delivered it to King Charles asking him to dissolve the government, what [would] he do? I dunno. I suspect the real answer is as it got close to looking like a majority, he'd call in the PM and politely ask him to resign or call an election "voluntarily" and not make this into a constitutional crisis likely to establish an actual precedent.
I don't know of any recent case where the British monarch refused to dissolve Parliament when asked to, or tried to when not, but IIANM, in some countries, like Italy, the President of the state (as opposed to the head of government) who fills the same role has refused to dissolve the legislature a few times in recent decades, insisting that the parties try again to form some kind of government.
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