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-   -   'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista) (http://forums.sjgames.com/showthread.php?t=83884)

jason taylor 04-08-2018 10:47 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Astromancer (Post 2169957)
Imperial Education Ministry

This ministry, in alliance with the Ministry of Culture, works to create a unified galactic culture. They don't bother trying to set the educational standards for everyone. A unified working class culture would only benefit Ine Givar. The IEM works to build and sustain a unified educational curriculum for the Nobility and the other elites of the Imperium. Such a curriculum creates a common language for the leaders of society. The IEM also works to make sure that the nobility get a somewhat better and more adaptable education. So that nobles simply seem smarter and more worthy.

The IEM also works to limit educational opportunities for those seen as a threat to the 3I. Also, certain ideas are keep out of circulation or in circulation according to their usefulness. The idea that "It's a proven fact democracy can't work on a galactic scale." is in point of fact unproved. However, keeping everybody of importance believing that it is a proven fact that democracy can't work keeps Ine Givar a fringe movement and keeps the masses willing to make sacrifices to sustain a system that marginalizes them. The Imperial Educational Ministry wants everybody to learn the lessons that suit their station in life. And especially those that keep them in that station.

To be honest it is hard for me to see how there can be democracy on that level. Indeed I really can't see how it is possible above the level of a town meeting. Having a hybrid is a different manner. But the general rule is oligarchy with a greater or lesser degree of public consent or at least indifference. In any case the Imperium seems to me to be a functional constitutional monarchy by virtue of the fact that the Emperor has only a mortal's attention span. At least that is the way I put it IMTU.

Astromancer 04-09-2018 11:41 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jason taylor (Post 2170271)
To be honest it is hard for me to see how there can be democracy on that level. Indeed I really can't see how it is possible above the level of a town meeting. Having a hybrid is a different manner. But the general rule is oligarchy with a greater or lesser degree of public consent or at least indifference. In any case the Imperium seems to me to be a functional constitutional monarchy by virtue of the fact that the Emperor has only a mortal's attention span. At least that is the way I put it IMTU.

The 3I lives by certain myths. If you remove the myth of galactic democracy being impossible, then democracy ceases to be a fringe belief. Whether or not democracy could work on that scale, the Imperium fears the chaos hope might bring.

Astromancer 04-15-2018 03:50 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
There really needs to be an Ine Givar sourcebook for Traveller. They're the rebels most likely to be sympathetic enough to be played as heroic NPCs or PCs. The Third Imperium has to be worried about them in much the same way early 19th century Britain was about the USA.

The only champions of galactic democracy need their sourcebook!

Astromancer 04-27-2018 05:48 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
In reading about the Vilani, I noticed that they were often described in terms that reminded me of 18th century descriptions of China. Not detail for detail, but they very much seem to fit within a Western fantasy about a superior other that maintains an enviable social control in a rational manner. A very common Enlightenment fantasy, look at Gulliver's Brobdingnag for an example that's easy to find.

Realizing how much Traveller is Brits in Space and how the British Raj influences the setting in it's view of aliens, it occued to me that taking Chinese cultural features and using them in the 3I fits perfectly well.

The Third Imperium needs to maintain the myth that Democracy is impossible. China has a long tradition of maintaining the same Fantasy. Chinese culture, with its refined elegance and long duration would be highly attractive in the Imperium.

Besides, the people of China would have been among those most likely to immigrate to the Vilani worlds during the Rule of Man and both most likely to retain their own culture and most likely to get along with the Vilani and understand where they are coming from.

Chinese cultural forms should be commonplace all over the Third Imperium. Just imagine what a British Raj of China would be like and snag those cultural forms.

jason taylor 04-27-2018 09:59 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Astromancer (Post 2173266)
In reading about the Vilani, I noticed that they were often described in terms that reminded me of 18th century descriptions of China. Not detail for detail, but they very much seem to fit within a Western fantasy about a superior other that maintains an enviable social control in a rational manner. A very common Enlightenment fantasy, look at Gulliver's Brobdingnag for an example that's easy to find.

Realizing how much Traveller is Brits in Space and how the British Raj influences the setting in it's view of aliens, it occued to me that taking Chinese cultural features and using them in the 3I fits perfectly well.

The Third Imperium needs to maintain the myth that Democracy is impossible. China has a long tradition of maintaining the same Fantasy. Chinese culture, with its refined elegance and long duration would be highly attractive in the Imperium.

Besides, the people of China would have been among those most likely to immigrate to the Vilani worlds during the Rule of Man and both most likely to retain their own culture and most likely to get along with the Vilani and understand where they are coming from.

Chinese cultural forms should be commonplace all over the Third Imperium. Just imagine what a British Raj of China would be like and snag those cultural forms.

I noticed the Chinese resemblance too. You can make the interaction rather like James Clavel.

Astromancer 04-28-2018 03:38 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jason taylor (Post 2173288)
I noticed the Chinese resemblance too. You can make the interaction rather like James Clavel.

I haven't read any of his Chinese novels, and Shogun I read back in the 1970's as a school assignment. So you'll need to refine your point for me.

jason taylor 04-28-2018 08:58 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Astromancer (Post 2173313)
I haven't read any of his Chinese novels, and Shogun I read back in the 1970's as a school assignment. So you'll need to refine your point for me.

I haven't either but the point is that they are about interaction between occidental and oriental cultures.

jason taylor 05-17-2018 08:15 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Victors stål: Saga Series


A popular multitool on many world's of the Spinward Marches both for it's versatility and it's aesthetic's. Slightly larger(though differing in functions) then the Huntsman model that Victors stål has reconstructed from the pre-starflight spiritual ancestor by the same name, the Saga has a wide variety of tools. In the top half are a large knife, a wood saw, a metal saw, a scissors, a combo hook-flathead screwdriver and a combo can opener-phillip's screwdriver. On the bottom are a wrist-com sized computer an integral power bank, a solar charger panel, and an interface module for the computer. On the end is, as is typical, a fastener, either a ring or a carabiner or in one variant a wire spool. Secondary tools on the bottom include a sparker and sonic probe, both surprisingly efficient for their size despite not being the same as similar devices in dedicated format. The scale also has an interface panel to see such primitive apps, as time, local weather, whatever. However there is no holographic system. Rather it links into a datacloth or other electronic device. Most models are usually sold with a multicompartment sheath that includes an interface cord and a foldable datacloth the size of a page of an old fashioned codex book. Many are grateful for the sheath which is also handy as a small ad-hoc wallet or sporran for odds and ends. It also has wireless capability though the many users prefer using a linked device for communications or linking to the datanet. In this format the knife can be used in the format of a mouse. In keeping with the theme, each knife has at least one of the Ancient Scandinavian sagas downloaded into the database. Similarly on the scale is an image of the saga that is the theme.

The Ragnarok edition is the most common. In a bit of typical Sword Worlds black humor, it is the one with the classic Victors stål red scales (signifying blood of course). Other editions include the Burnt Njal edition, the Vinlander edition, the Hrolf Krakki edition, and of course the Volsunga edition and many more. The inevitable Gramsmen is the only one not referencing either a mythological or early Medieval setting in it's primary tale, but rather the original founding of the Sword Worlds. It also includes the several others including the two Eddas (Which are also in the Hundingsbane, and the Heimskringla knives). Naturally it has a starscape picture on the scale just as the Volsunga shows a picture of piled gold on the scale with Fafnir on one side and Sigurd on another. A few knifes were dedicated to tales written by Swordworlders, such as the Saga of Margret Craftwise about the reputed carver of the Lewis Chessmen.

The best of these are quite collectable while average priced models are suitable for daily work and are often found in a Swordies toolkit. While even the average price can be hefty considering some of the advanced miniaturization required, they are sturdy and can last for years and a craftsman who respects his tools can often find a Saga attractive. Moreover aside from the fact that a true Swordie is expected to know what to do with a knife Victors stål maintains a chain of repair stores as one of it's "hooks" as well as, like typical Swordie producers, handing out well-written user manuels. Several of these knives have already become part of a "legacy" being willed to a Swordie Patriarch's heir.

cptbutton 05-17-2018 09:19 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jason taylor (Post 2176937)
On the bottom are a wrist-com sized computer an integral power bank, a solar charger panel, and an interface module for the computer. Secondary tools on the bottom include a sparker and sonic probe. The scale also has an interface panel to see such primitive apps, as time, local weather, whatever.

Another app to have would be one for celestial navigation, hopefully with datafiles for the planet you crashed on. And an antenna to plug in for the planets GPS system, if present.

One of my own IMTU ideas is that if a planet has any significant habitation at all, there will be a basic set of communication, weather, and navigation satellites.

jason taylor 05-17-2018 09:32 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cptbutton (Post 2176948)
Another app to have would be one for celestial navigation, hopefully with datafiles for the planet you crashed on. And an antenna to plug in for the planets GPS system, if present.

One of my own IMTU ideas is that if a planet has any significant habitation at all, there will be a basic set of communication, weather, and navigation satellites.

Those aren't bad ideas. The antenna would probably be either integral to the main interface module or plugged into it. As the main interface module is where any communications plug goes it stands to reason that that would be where to place something of the kind.


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