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-   -   'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista) (http://forums.sjgames.com/showthread.php?t=83884)

Drifter 11-25-2013 10:13 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Streetnames, or lack there of...

On many low-tech world where travel is limited to animal power or on foot, street names are only "necessary" on the larger roadways paved and maintained by whatever passes for the local government. The paths and open areas between hovels, on the other hand, can be temporary at best, with people setting up shops or building homes or businesses whever they please. These 'streets' are unnammed, directions amount to "go past the duck merchant, left at the community well, and my house is the one with the big brown dog in front of it".

Increased tech levels that allow people not of the immediate area to travel to, and need directions for, towns and cities, along with increased Law/Control level that enforce zoning regulations, mean streets themselves must be given a designation. "Go down Duck Avenue, turn left on Well Street, and my house is at 1422. Look out for my dog".

At tech levels where GPS becomes common, and grav vehicles allow travel of tremendous distances, street names become less of necessity, again relegated to sources of civic or cultural pride rather than functional tools. A driver would fly his vehicle to a coordinate on a mapgrid, rather than navigating by local landmarks. "My home is at 137.255/254.475." At higher Law/Control levels vehicles traffic would be controlled by a central system, a 'driver' would just tell the vehicle "take me to Eneri's house".

Higher Law/Control levels imply higher rates of litigation, so you might not even be allowed to fly there unless you agree to face known dangers "Eneri's house is licensed to board a class 3 guard animal, if you wish to proceed, waiving all rights to seek damages against this vehicle, vehicle agency and Eneri Jones, please click here"

cptbutton 11-25-2013 05:13 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Drifter (Post 1685039)
Streetnames, or lack there of...

On many low-tech world where travel is limited to animal power or on foot, street names are only "necessary" on the larger roadways paved and maintained by whatever passes for the local government. The paths and open areas between hovels, on the other hand, can be temporary at best, with people setting up shops or building homes or businesses whever they please. These 'streets' are unnammed, directions amount to "go past the duck merchant, left at the community well, and my house is the one with the big brown dog in front of it".

Increased tech levels that allow people not of the immediate area to travel to, and need directions for, towns and cities, along with increased Law/Control level that enforce zoning regulations, mean streets themselves must be given a designation. "Go down Duck Avenue, turn left on Well Street, and my house is at 1422. Look out for my dog".

At tech levels where GPS becomes common, and grav vehicles allow travel of tremendous distances, street names become less of necessity, again relegated to sources of civic or cultural pride rather than functional tools. A driver would fly his vehicle to a coordinate on a mapgrid, rather than navigating by local landmarks. "My home is at 137.255/254.475." At higher Law/Control levels vehicles traffic would be controlled by a central system, a 'driver' would just tell the vehicle "take me to Eneri's house".

Higher Law/Control levels imply higher rates of litigation, so you might not even be allowed to fly there unless you agree to face known dangers "Eneri's house is licensed to board a class 3 guard animal, if you wish to proceed, waiving all rights to seek damages against this vehicle, vehicle agency and Eneri Jones, please click here"

I've heard that navigating in Japan is tricky for Americans et al because addresses aren't based on streets, they are based on blocks, or something like that.

Drifter 11-25-2013 05:47 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cptbutton (Post 1685340)
I've heard that navigating in Japan is tricky for Americans et al because addresses aren't based on streets, they are based on blocks, or something like that.

Yes, that is where the germ of this idea came from.

doulos05 11-25-2013 08:44 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cptbutton (Post 1685340)
I've heard that navigating in Japan is tricky for Americans et al because addresses aren't based on streets, they are based on blocks, or something like that.

Korea also, it's based on 'neighborhoods', which occasionally correspond to a block (though I'm inclined to believe the correspondence is completely coincidental). And yes, it can be quite confusing. Even more confusing because they're trying to switch to a street system so right now everybody has two addresses and they're both completely different... If only humans were better at remembering GPS coordinates, then the problem would be solved...
"What's your address?"
"37.537502 by 126.986991 apartment 305"

jason taylor 12-24-2013 05:27 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Two bits of folk-art:

Artificial Scrimshaw: As is widely known many of the traditions of spacers especially those of Solimani descent were inspired by pre-starflight ocean traditions on Terra. This includes the folk-art of "scrimshaw" or whale bone carving. As whales are rare and hunting them is illegal in many places due to their wide claim of near-sophant status a common custom is plastic scrimshaw. These are blocks of plastic made to the texture and color of whalebone and sold at Starports for spacers to carve on during voyages. Many Starports hold contests in scrimshaw work and maintain the best examples in their museums and guildhalls. Artificial scrimshaw is used on it's own or as a decorative feature of various products; the famed Alexandria handcomp is often sold with a sheath made of scrimshaw for those willing to pay the price. A common add on is another classic art feature of starport culture: world gems.

World gems are a combination of a dataholder and a bauble. The dataholder will usually contain writing specific to a planet being visited; perhaps a famous poem, or a collection of local literature, or an encyclopedia of local history, or simply a freeze frame of the datanet at the time of the customers visit. The gem is a picture of the planet in two-d or three-d form; globe shapes are naturally favored. World gems contain features that allow them to be attached to other items or to be plugged into a computer to upload their information. They are commonly worn in necklaces or belts, or attached to a scrimshaw production by various means. World gems come in various forms, from inexpensive ones sold at Starport retailers and well within the means of a typical spacer; to prize works of art that would be the mark of a successful merchant or captain.

jason taylor 09-08-2014 07:40 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Caravanserais:

Despite the etymology of the name, in Emperor Strephon's time these are not primarily places to tie animals, although ships carrying livestock might do so as might a world which still uses animals for on-planet transport in the common occasions where off-world and on-world trading ventures meet in the same facility.

A Caravanserai rather is a semiinstitutionalized bazaar growing up around the shipping berths, especially in the Free Trader section of Starport. While these are often confused with Startowns, they are not the same. They are not normally on the border between SPA and local jurisdiction and the nearness of valueable ships and cargo ensures that the area will be patrolled; if not by police then by mercenaries, and should that not be available by spacers and stevedores seconded to the duty. Customers can usually count on being safe from violence if not from the law of Caveat Emptor.

While caravanserais are sometimes romanticized as places to find speculative cargo with a cachet to them, the primary goods bought and sold here are "kintledge" that is goods carried as an afterthought to avoid having empty space.

Often spacers will camp out beside the wares offloaded for sale. This provides a minute extra security as well as offering a substitute for port liberty should such not be in the cards.

jason taylor 09-10-2014 04:08 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
The roundels:

A darkly humorous badge of rank worn by Patricians. A cap with target roundels on the forehead (facing a hypothetical enemy) and on the rear(facing the Patricians followers. On the forehead is written Est Praecipium Ius Rank (Rank Hath It's Privileges) in Latin. On the rear roundels even more darkly is Ultima Ratio Publici (final argument of the public).

Variations come in circlets, necklaces, etc.

Voltron64 12-26-2014 11:40 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
To the people of the Third Imperium, an Imperial Marine clad in Battledress with cutlass in one hand and plasma gun or a gauss rifle in the other is as quintessential and iconic an image to them as a Knight in Shining Armor.

Hans Rancke-Madsen 12-26-2014 04:03 PM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Voltron64 (Post 1851959)
To the people of the Third Imperium, an Imperial Marine clad in Battledress with cutlass in one hand and plasma gun or a gauss rifle in the other is as quintessential and iconic an image to them as a Knight in Shining Armor.

I wonder. The positive aspect of the Imperium to its citizens has to be the keeping of the peace between systems, protection of trade, that sort of thing. Citizens of member worlds wouldn't like the Imperial Marines coming calling. That would mean that there was a serious disagreement between the Imperium and their homeworld and the marines would be there to make sure their world changed its mind and saw things the Imperium's way, willy-nilly. So I think the battledressed marine is much more likely to be a symbol of oppression. The "Knight in Shining Armor" would be an Imperial Navy officer in full uniform.


Hans

jason taylor 12-27-2014 12:16 AM

Re: 'Imperial Culture' (non-canonista)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hans Rancke-Madsen (Post 1852021)
I wonder. The positive aspect of the Imperium to its citizens has to be the keeping of the peace between systems, protection of trade, that sort of thing. Citizens of member worlds wouldn't like the Imperial Marines coming calling. That would mean that there was a serious disagreement between the Imperium and their homeworld and the marines would be there to make sure their world changed its mind and saw things the Imperium's way, willy-nilly. So I think the battledressed marine is much more likely to be a symbol of oppression. The "Knight in Shining Armor" would be an Imperial Navy officer in full uniform.


Hans

I should think that would vary. On a restive world certainly. On a loyal Imperial world that exports marines they would be a symbol of nativist pride.


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