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-   -   Cribing Notes From Star Wars (http://forums.sjgames.com/showthread.php?t=169662)

pawsplay 08-05-2020 04:04 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by scc (Post 2336413)

b) Bigger ships tend to be slower, so how much should speed to be reduced per increase in SM?

In Star Wars, big ships tend to be faster, up to a point. The big capital ships are about half as fast as the cruisers, and mobile space stations like the Death Star half to 1/4 as fast as a capital ship.

Some superiority fighters like the X-wing and TIE fighter are faster than a cruiser but they are a specialized design. Even though Star Wars looks like an aircraft carrier with a bunch of planes, conceptually it's more like a cruiser with a bunch of patrol boats.

Quote:

c) I'm planning to use a systems where hyperspace multiplies your speed by the function Y^X, where X is the FTL rating of your ship and Y is a constant, given the above constraints what values do people suggest for Y and what should the default FTL rating be?
That depends on the size of your neighborhood.

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3. Minor money matters: Money changers charge how much? 10% And when the empire started shedding systems how long could former systems go on using imperial currency without problems?
10% is high, but not outlandish. That's about what moneychangers in ancient Rome charged, having to test the weight of metals themselves. Modern day you are looking at 1% to 5%, maybe 10% if you try to do it right on the beach. Generally speaking, moneychangers make a little money by quickly adjusting to changes in the exchange rate when it favors them, and slowly adjusting when it doesn't.

AlexanderHowl 08-05-2020 06:29 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Star Wars is high superscience. I would suggest using cosmic power systems, cosmic weapons and force screens, etc. As for STL speed, use boost drives, giving you a maximum velocity and insane maneuverability. As for FTL speed, it is fast along charted hyperspace routes (something like 1,000,000c for military ships and 100,000c for civilian ships), but difficult to suicidal for uncharted hyperspace routes.

A good rule of thumb is that 10% of the systems in the Galactic Arms are connected through the same system of routes and that 10% of them have been charted. This gives you over a billion systems to work withm Of those, 10% may have been human dominated and 10% may have been part of the Old Republic.

Fred Brackin 08-05-2020 06:36 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Phantasm (Post 2337035)

So I'd say between 75 and 150 lightyears is a good radius for 130 inhabitable planets,

That's about as optimistic as is physically possible. The most detailed and scientific figure I've seen on these forums was more like 200 ly betwen each habitable planet.

It doesn't actually matter. The farther apart the habitable planets are the faster you make your drive. It's just that if you make them too close together somebody like me will know that's not possible.

pawsplay 08-05-2020 06:48 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Going by the lore, once you get into well-mapped, mostly empty space, FTL travel in Star Wars is very close to teleportation. The trick is avoiding large gravity shadows.

Varyon 08-05-2020 07:25 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pawsplay (Post 2337081)
Going by the lore, once you get into well-mapped, mostly empty space, FTL travel in Star Wars is very close to teleportation. The trick is avoiding large gravity shadows.

I think even the movies implied it took more than a moment to travel through hyperspace (I can't find a clip online, but I'm pretty certain after the Millennium Falcon jumped to hyperspace Han wasn't like "Alright, we jumped to lightspeed and... we're here"), and outside of the movies there's usually a big deal made about hyperspace speed (heck, that's even what made the Falcon special, it's just that George Lucas apparently thought "parsec" was a measurement of time when he wrote Han's dialogue), so I don't think treating the time to travel as negligible is appropriate. Certainly, Star Wars travel is very much "speed of plot," but that doesn't lend itself well to making an RPG setting.

Prince Charon 08-05-2020 08:23 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Varyon (Post 2337095)
I think even the movies implied it took more than a moment to travel through hyperspace (I can't find a clip online, but I'm pretty certain after the Millennium Falcon jumped to hyperspace Han wasn't like "Alright, we jumped to lightspeed and... we're here"), and outside of the movies there's usually a big deal made about hyperspace speed (heck, that's even what made the Falcon special, it's just that George Lucas apparently thought "parsec" was a measurement of time when he wrote Han's dialogue), so I don't think treating the time to travel as negligible is appropriate. Certainly, Star Wars travel is very much "speed of plot," but that doesn't lend itself well to making an RPG setting.

No, the script makes it clear that Han is bull$#!+ing at Luke, with Obi-Wan rolling his eyes or something, it's just that the scene cuts away too fast to easily notice Alec Guinness's reaction.

Varyon 08-05-2020 08:52 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Prince Charon (Post 2337107)
No, the script makes it clear that Han is bull$#!+ing at Luke, with Obi-Wan rolling his eyes or something, it's just that the scene cuts away too fast to easily notice Alec Guinness's reaction.

I guess this was eventually forgotten, then, seeing as it was true in both Legends canon (it involved traveling around a cluster of black holes, but Solo had managed to weave between them and shorten the distance) and the new Disney canon (which was similar, but also had some sort of weird space storm going on). Poking around on Wookiepedia, it looks like the script did indeed indicate it was a lie (although whether because it was impossible, or Han was speaking nonsense, isn't clear), but the novelization changed "parsecs" to "standard time units" in the dialogue, while apparently as early as 1977 Lucas was treating the claim as true, with the Falcon's navigational computer being sufficiently advanced to plot a shorter path than others, hence the bragging about making the run in a short distance rather than short time.

Personally, my assumption would be Lucas wrote it thinking "parsec" was a unit of time (much as "lightyear" is often used inaccurately), then when he got called out on it his ego wouldn't let him be wrong, so he knee-jerk changed it to be that he really did mean it as a distance, and even made what he initially scripted as a lie be true.

Refplace 08-05-2020 09:58 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Prince Charon (Post 2337107)
No, the script makes it clear that Han is bull$#!+ing at Luke, with Obi-Wan rolling his eyes or something, it's just that the scene cuts away too fast to easily notice Alec Guinness's reaction.

They made it effective and cannon in the late Han Solo movie.
Basically jump routes are mapped and measured in distance but he took a dangerous shortcut so traveled the distance in less than what the mapped routes were.

AlexanderHowl 08-05-2020 10:08 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
A previously uncharted hyperspace route, if I remember correctly, which meant that Solo possessed knowledge that he could have likely traded to the Empire for his own planet if he had not been a criminal. It also explains why he was a successful smuggler.

scc 08-05-2020 10:43 PM

Re: Cribing Notes From Star Wars
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Phantasm (Post 2337035)
In a 20 ly radius around Earth, there are 22 stars in the K, G, and F range, including four binary* and three trinary** systems, which have the potential for stable orbits in the life zone. If we assume even half of those have an inhabitable planet in the life zone, that's 11 potentially inhabitable planets. That number almost doubles if you include M0 to M3 type stars.

So I'd say between 75 and 150 lightyears is a good radius for 130 inhabitable planets, depending on how you have the population density of stars.




* Counting Alpha Centauri as a binary here, with Proxima far enough out to not affect the other two's life zones. Procyon, 61 Cygni, and 82 Eridani are the other binary systems, and 82 Eridani is a close-orbiting binary with a combined brightness in the G5 range. Procyon, like Sirius, has a white dwarf companion, so likely does not have an inhabitable planet.


** 36 Ophiuchi, with two K-type stars 8 AU apart at closest approach, and a third K-type 4340 AU away from the binary; Gliese 570 is a K-type star with a close-orbiting binary reaching M1 brightness; Omicron(2) Eridani, a K-type star with a white dwarf and a red dwarf orbiting each other, getting 20 AU away from the main star at closest approach

You forgot to account for the fact that things will scale by the cube here, so 60 ly means 27 times the stars! If I set it the 50ly radius sphere and take my 1 years figure from earlier as from the centre, that means that standard combat velocity is 1/250the the speed of light, about 744 MPS, or something like 5,900 times the speed of WW2 fighter planes. And those numbers are wrong, but if I want to keep the .005c speed limit and take 3125 as the normal speed multiplier I can have the distance travelable in three years, which I think will work out, 15 times the speed of light puts the Sol- Alpha Centauri trip at about 4 months. This cost a SM+4 fitgher that would otherwise cost $1.1M, $7.5M

Quote:

Originally Posted by pawsplay (Post 2337039)
In Star Wars, big ships tend to be faster, up to a point. The big capital ships are about half as fast as the cruisers, and mobile space stations like the Death Star half to 1/4 as fast as a capital ship.

Star Destroyers are an anomaly on ship speeds, or at least those we have data on.


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