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-   -   Clothing in Spaaaaaaace! (http://forums.sjgames.com/showthread.php?t=91235)

Sindri 05-02-2012 05:06 AM

Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
In freefall more specifically.

Clothing is a source of setting and character flavour so it pays to pay a certain amount of attention to it, not to mention it's use as a shorthand way of identifying societies. The guys wearing the pseudo-neo-medieval (or other historical era and location of choice.) clothing, are different from the guys wearing contemporary clothing (with perhaps some small modifications.), are different fromt the guys wearing just terrible space clothes(let's try to avoid that.), are different from the guys wearing togas.

Unfortunately the fact is that pretty much all of our clothing has been designed for an environment where things fall down. In freefall your stylish long coat fails to function at best and constantly gets in the worst possible place at worst while dresses, skirts, kilts, and togas are generally strictly decorative requiring an underlayer that functions as actual clothing. Even other clothing doesn't function well. Jackets especially but loose items in general don't lie properly and hats and things placed in pockets escape easier.

Options
There is form fitting clothing with both the skin-tight clothes (coming in black, white, and shiny) with a long history in SF and practical advantages besides and looser clothing based on fatigues or overalls.

Items that won't be troublesome but also won't actually function as covering by themeselves in the freefall environment can be overlaid on top.

Even if all anyone wore was form fitting interesting variations could be achieved through layering and colours

Clothing could possibly be induced to fall to a given face of a room with magnetics which would allow much the same chocies of clothing as here on earth, though given the maneuverability offered by freefall clothing won't always stay where it should relative to the wearer.

Clothing could be tied so that while it has a degree of freedom it can't totally fly off and cause trouble.

Clothing can also vary based on exposure of skin but that's pretty much just a modifier of the other options. Also I'm not sure if people would want to expose skin with metal shavings floating around and possibly use of metal gratings to save mass combined with the difficulty of people new to freefall not bumping into things constantly.

Comments? Have I missed anything or am I mistaken somewhere? How do people dress in your freefall? Also what are some small details like like the lapels or collars in Babylon 5 that can reinforce that, hey, this takes place in the future?

ham2anv 05-02-2012 05:24 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
In my space setting, it is SOP for spacers to wear a skinsuit (UT178) under any other clothing, along with a waist pack that holds a flexible space helmet (UT180) and a mini air tank (UT177). This provides the bare minimum of protection in the case of compartment decompression.

As for fashion, most clothing includes zippers, snaps, or buckles that allow the garments to be drawn close in freefall or to hang free in gravity. Garments tend toward trousers, shirts, and jackets for both male and female spacers.

RyanW 05-02-2012 06:07 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
I believe I've posted this observation before, but my biggest complaint about most TV sci-fi clothing, particularly Star Trek, is simple: Once you live in an environment you have full control over, the primary purpose of clothing is to have something to attach pockets to.

nondescript handle 05-02-2012 06:25 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Unless you'll have very exotic places like the smoke ring from Niven's Integral Trees, all environments with free fall will also be totally temperature controlled. On todays ISS basically everyone wears polo shirts.

I guess I can see full arm shirts for a space navy mess dress or stewards of interplanetary luxury liners, but I have a hard time envisioning multi layer clothing (e.g. a toga over form fitting clothing, a shirt under an uniform tunic) in such a context.

My guess would be that informal civilian dress in a shirt sleeve free fall environment would be something like (not too loose) shorts and T-shirt (worn inside shorts) and bare feet.

For people for whom EVA is common (e.g. the SF cliché of the "belter" miner), an "undersuit" might be typical "inside" clothing (and designed to be worn as such).

I don't think that a spacer culture will routinely wear emergency gear for decompression. If decompressions are that common that you'll have to wear such things, it will not be a "culture" but a frontier were experts spend limited time in.

I mean most of our earthling homes are flammable, but most people don't wear fire extinguishers...

digoraccoon 05-02-2012 07:10 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RyanW (Post 1364490)
Once you live in an environment you have full control over, the primary purpose of clothing is to have something to attach pockets to.

That sounds about right.
In a space adventure I wrote, most characters wore jumpsuits with strips of velcro and expanding pockets so that they can attach objects to themselves while they float through microgravity sections of their colony ship.

nondescript handle 05-02-2012 07:29 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by digoraccoon (Post 1364544)
[...] most characters wore jumpsuits [...]

Even if you postulate TL10 urinals that make peeing in free fall for men as easy as it is in 1g gravity, women and girls will most likely hate jumpsuits/coveralls with the same burning passion they do now in 1g.

But that could start gender specific clothing norms even for an otherwise non-gendered spacer culture: men wear jumpsuits, women wear separate tops and bottoms.

Fred Brackin 05-02-2012 08:14 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nondescript handle (Post 1364563)
Even if you postulate TL10 urinals that make peeing in free fall for men as easy as it is in 1g gravity, women and girls will most likely hate jumpsuits/coveralls with the same burning passion they do now in 1g.

Only one of the reasons why I believe there will never be any large populations living in Zero-G. It'll be spin gravity if nothing else.

So the question of clothing for Zero-G isn't going to come up IMHO.

malloyd 05-02-2012 11:00 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nondescript handle (Post 1364563)
Even if you postulate TL10 urinals that make peeing in free fall for men as easy as it is in 1g gravity, women and girls will most likely hate jumpsuits/coveralls with the same burning passion they do now in 1g.

Also, you have to be able to get the clothing on and off. Here in gravity you can "pull up" a whole body suit pretty easily because gravity holds your body down. In zero-G that doesn't happen. I suspect this rules out both non-rigid whole body suits and anything really form fitting. If you need to exert a significant push or pull to force it on or off, that's a problem. Dress shoes you need a shoe horn to get on are right out.

Sindri 05-02-2012 11:59 AM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RyanW (Post 1364490)
I believe I've posted this observation before, but my biggest complaint about most TV sci-fi clothing, particularly Star Trek, is simple: Once you live in an environment you have full control over, the primary purpose of clothing is to have something to attach pockets to.

Yeah pockets are important though from the point of view of practicality I would wear a belt or something with attached sealable pockets. Finding your keys wouldn't be a problem if you weren't constantly moving them from one article of clothing to another. With a belt you can just put everything you need on a day to day basis in the pockets and just keep it there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by nondescript handle (Post 1364500)
Unless you'll have very exotic places like the smoke ring from Niven's Integral Trees, all environments with free fall will also be totally temperature controlled. On todays ISS basically everyone wears polo shirts.

I guess I can see full arm shirts for a space navy mess dress or stewards of interplanetary luxury liners, but I have a hard time envisioning multi layer clothing (e.g. a toga over form fitting clothing, a shirt under an uniform tunic) in such a context.

My guess would be that informal civilian dress in a shirt sleeve free fall environment would be something like (not too loose) shorts and T-shirt (worn inside shorts) and bare feet.

For people for whom EVA is common (e.g. the SF cliché of the "belter" miner), an "undersuit" might be typical "inside" clothing (and designed to be worn as such).

I don't think that a spacer culture will routinely wear emergency gear for decompression. If decompressions are that common that you'll have to wear such things, it will not be a "culture" but a frontier were experts spend limited time in.

I mean most of our earthling homes are flammable, but most people don't wear fire extinguishers...

Meh. I spend most of my time in temperature controlled environments and I wear a coat. People like to layer things for the same reason I want people in my setting to layer: everyone wearing the same thing is boring.

I can't see bare feet at all. Even if the rest of the clothing doesn't use magnetism to pull it down, magnetic footwear is too useful in a freefall situation and too many of the surfaces will be too rough or covered in metal shavings or something for it to be practical

People might carry emergency gear for reasons involving tradition or paranoia. I can see a space military assigning it to everyone. Otherwise yeah I agree that only undersuits make more sense for routine or time critical unexpected EVA or as part of the method used to get rid of bad health effects due to freefall. You can get to the emergency equipment that falls from the ceiling fast enough.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fred Brackin (Post 1364581)
Only one of the reasons why I believe there will never be any large populations living in freefall. It'll be spin gravity if nothing else.

So the question of clothing for freefall isn't going to come up IMHO.

Many station designs that incorporate spin gravity also have areas of freefall (both for simplicity of engineering and the fact that freefall is useful for some purposes) that the clothing of residents will consider for in their design.

Quote:

Originally Posted by malloyd (Post 1364652)
Also, you have to be able to get the clothing on and off. Here in gravity you can "pull up" a whole body suit pretty easily because gravity holds your body down. In freefall that doesn't happen. I suspect this rules out both non-rigid whole body suits and anything really form fitting. If you need to exert a significant push or pull to force it on or off, that's a problem. Dress shoes you need a shoe horn to get on are right out.

Form fitting doesn't necessarily need to be form fitting when it's going on it can tighten after being put on. Example from fiction include the seam tubes from some SF illustrations and the plugsuits of NGE. Also some people will wear what they think is cool no matter how much of a pain it is to get into. The possibility of partial spin gravity helps here too.

Jerander 05-02-2012 12:21 PM

Re: Clothing in Spaaaaaaace!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by malloyd (Post 1364652)
Also, you have to be able to get the clothing on and off. Here in gravity you can "pull up" a whole body suit pretty easily because gravity holds your body down. In zero-G that doesn't happen. I suspect this rules out both non-rigid whole body suits and anything really form fitting. If you need to exert a significant push or pull to force it on or off, that's a problem. Dress shoes you need a shoe horn to get on are right out.

I thought it was the motion of your hands (holding onto one portion of the suit) relative to the motion of your feet ("holding onto" another portion of the suit) that caused the suit to move "up" your body. This motion will be complicated by zero-G, but then so are most motions...


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