Steve Jackson Games - Site Navigation
Home General Info Follow Us Search Illuminator Store Forums What's New Other Games Ogre GURPS Munchkin Our Games: Home

Go Back   Steve Jackson Games Forums > Roleplaying > Transhuman Space

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-08-2018, 11:16 PM   #31
Flyndaran
Untagged
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Forest Grove, Beaverton, Oregon
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

It may or may not be hazardous for the majority of us, but that's not everyone, and at worst, it would be long term.
TS has loads of biotech to make that a non-issue long before 2100.
__________________
Beware, poor communication skills. No offense intended. If offended, it just means that I failed my writing skill check.
Flyndaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 02:20 AM   #32
RogerBW
 
RogerBW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: near London, UK
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zenfrog View Post
People really complained about that? Given that Traveler 2300AD is a continuation of Twilight 2000 timeline and France was the only large European country survive WWIII intact, then it makes perfect sense that France would be a world leader.
Oh, yes. I was at a seminar on the Great Game in 1988 (GenCon), and Lester Smith (I think) said "look, guys, you're supposed to dislike the French" to general amazement - lots of gamers had assumed that, since they were the power largely in charge of things in the area that the game depicted, they were supposed to be the good guys.
RogerBW is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 04:56 PM   #33
Polydamas
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central Europe
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zenfrog View Post
One of the bigger concerns about Mars is that its gravity may be low enough to be a serious health hazard. We won't know until we send someone there or we create a small spin habitat in Earth's orbit to replicate gravity on Mars.
My Transhuman Space books are back in the old country, but I think I remember that this is a solved problem for humans with the right gene-mods, nanites, and medical treatment.

Does anyone know much about biotech? Has any of their tech moved from 'maaybe if we are lucky and people do some horrific experiments' to 'nah'?
__________________
"It is easier to banish a habit of thought than a piece of knowledge." H. Beam Piper
Polydamas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 05:56 PM   #34
sir_pudding
Wielder of Smart Pants
 
sir_pudding's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ventura CA
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

  • The rates given for nanogenesis are probably impossible.
  • The Ares Conspiracy cannot have caused the specified effects which are off by several orders of magnitude.
  • Europeans are pretty dubious. Mostly because the setting underplays how harsh that environment actually would be.
  • The basically decanonized Doolittle virus is silly.
sir_pudding is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 06:11 PM   #35
Anthony
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Berkeley, CA
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

To be fair, none of those things have 'moved'. They were all pretty much 'nah' when THS was first published.
__________________
My GURPS site and Blog.
Anthony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 07:31 PM   #36
whswhs
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_pudding View Post
[*] Europeans are pretty dubious. Mostly because the setting underplays how harsh that environment actually would be.
Was that meant to be "Europans"?
__________________
Bill Stoddard

A human being should know how to live fast, die young, and leave a beautiful corpse. Specialization is for insects.
whswhs is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 07:40 PM   #37
Flyndaran
Untagged
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Forest Grove, Beaverton, Oregon
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Maybe he's just suspicious of Europe in general. What with their funny way of speaking. JK

Europans though... I'm really skeptical of altering the human genome to something capable of surviving as a "cold-blooded" non-Earth seawater breathing fish form. But at least it doesn't break any laws of physics that I know of.
__________________
Beware, poor communication skills. No offense intended. If offended, it just means that I failed my writing skill check.
Flyndaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 07:51 PM   #38
Fred Brackin
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyndaran View Post
Europans though... I'm really skeptical of altering the human genome to something capable of surviving as a "cold-blooded" non-Earth seawater breathing fish form. But at least it doesn't break any laws of physics that I know of.
Gills for anybody anywhere are pretty dubious. It goes back to the turbo-pumps for liquid fuel rockets in a way.

Air carries 30x as much oxygen as water can so a set of gills for a human-like being have to move 30x as much water as lungs for them would move air. Cut that in half for "cold-blooded" and it's still a question of "How?" and "Why aren't they using if for propulsion too?".

Like the turbopumps there may be an "extreme" answer but that extremeness might be pretty obvious such as "gills" that are larger than the organism they supply
__________________
Fred Brackin
Fred Brackin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2018, 03:15 AM   #39
vicky_molokh
GURPS FAQ Keeper
 
vicky_molokh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Kyv, Ukraine
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polydamas View Post
Does anyone know much about biotech? Has any of their tech moved from 'maaybe if we are lucky and people do some horrific experiments' to 'nah'?
Even if nothing changed about bio-tech futurological knowledge, it seems to me that THS' attitude has changed, and that modern THS is ashamed of the optimism and radicalness with which it was conceived, and wants to push the genie back into the bottle. Probably the most blatant example is the amount of effort in the Bioroid Bazaar to make pheromone glands either illegal or useless, even though comparable fully-synthetic aerosols of the setting are both legal and effective. Or how about the attempts to deprive memetics of its revolutionary usefulness by making their effects weaker. Other examples would be more subtle and/or subjective, but I'd say that newer books seem to be less inclined to include signs of radical technologies or ideologies (as compared to 'oldies' such as Cabals, Hamlin, a major chunk of bio- and stellar-tech and Eidolons from Deep Beyond, Wiper Treatment etc.).
__________________
Vicky 'Molokh', GURPS FAQ and uFAQ Keeper
Also, GURPS Discord is a nice place for (faster) Q&A and overall GURPS dicussion.
vicky_molokh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2018, 05:26 AM   #40
Polydamas
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Central Europe
Default Re: Is TS optimistic or pessimistic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky_molokh View Post
Even if nothing changed about bio-tech futurological knowledge, it seems to me that THS' attitude has changed, and that modern THS is ashamed of the optimism and radicalness with which it was conceived, and wants to push the genie back into the bottle. Probably the most blatant example is the amount of effort in the Bioroid Bazaar to make pheromone glands either illegal or useless, even though comparable fully-synthetic aerosols of the setting are both legal and effective. Or how about the attempts to deprive memetics of its revolutionary usefulness by making their effects weaker. Other examples would be more subtle and/or subjective, but I'd say that newer books seem to be less inclined to include signs of radical technologies or ideologies (as compared to 'oldies' such as Cabals, Hamlin, a major chunk of bio- and stellar-tech and Eidolons from Deep Beyond, Wiper Treatment etc.).
I don't know the later THS books, but that kind of thing is why I don't put too much weight on assessments of the plausability of distant technology. Beyond some very basic things which people have been arguing about for a long time (so interstellar travel by anything but tiny robotic probes is 'almost certainly not'), usually there are a lot of assumptions and simplifications involved, and those assumptions and simplifications reflect our culture. There are quite a few areas of science where engineering runs ahead of theory: I have seen a case where a metallurgist declared in print that something was impossible, and a few decades later several people went out and did it in a backyard forge because their techniques had advanced enough.

I think that THS has about the right amount of weirdness. Our 2100 will have different weird, but thinking about THS helps to prepare us for the fact that the future will be strange and alien and full of things we never imagined and things we thought were impossible.
__________________
"It is easier to banish a habit of thought than a piece of knowledge." H. Beam Piper
Polydamas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Fnords are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.