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Old 07-20-2017, 03:59 AM   #1
Alonsua
 
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Default Campaign chronology seeking constructive criticism

Good morning,

this will be a reading so I will thank everyone who takes the trouble to advise me. Adam and Mary are two bioengineered polymaths with an overall IQ of about 180 (they have around 220 in their respective fields of work). They run a megacorporation which was founded in 2018 and are prolific inventors themselves. I am not sure what the regulations are for each of the prizes so I simply named them winners because of the importance of their discoveries (Maybe they can not win a Nobel for two consecutive years?) and would greatly appreciate maintaining a certain level of realism in this. Thanks in advantage:

Ps. Looking specially for Prizes and Awards dating advice :)


Transhuman International Inc. (year 2032)
"A Future is Forever." (Eve-Mary Sepherd)

Employees: 3.076.235
Assets: 2.490.368.000.000$
Gross sales: 2.929.844.705.882,35$
Operating profit: 284.688.384.000$
Industries
Aerospace, agriculture, chemical, computer, construction, defense, energy, entertainment, food, health, manufacturing and mass media.

The conglomerate is subdivided into three major branches:
Transhuman Church (Entertainment and mass media)
Employees: 146.000 Assets: 113.880.000.000$
LilyCare (Agriculture, chemical, energy, food, health and manufacturing)
Employees: 1.384.042 Assets: 1.122.734.870.400$
EveTech (Aerospace, computer, construction, defense, energy and manufacturing)
Employees: 1.546.193 Assets: 1.254.271.761.600$


2017
March 21st:
Adam and Mary create BioCad bioengineering software.
July 18:
Mary creates the Irdin programming language.

2018
January 13th:
Mary creates the first true artificial intelligence.
June 24:
Mary wins the Turing Award.
30th of October:
Adam creates the cancer cure.

2019
March 22:
Adam patents new surgical treatments of the spine.
April 11:
Adam creates avant-garde cognitive stimulants.
May 4th:
Adam creates cutting-edge doping substances.
May 20th:
Adam creates medications that slow down aging.
Mary creates the new generation of central computers.
June 24:
Mary wins the Turing Award for the second consecutive year.
December 10:
Adam wins the Nobel Prize for Medicine.

2020
June 24:
Mary wins the Turing Award for the third consecutive year.
December 10:
Adam wins the Nobel Prize for Medicine for the second consecutive year.

2021
March 18th:
Adam creates new Bio-tissues similar to human skin.
Mary creates an avant-garde humanoid robot.

2022
June 6th:
Mary wins the DARPA Award.
December 10:
Adam wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

2024
August 21:
Adam and Mary found the Transhuman Church.

2025
Mary creates artwork such as:
Lyrical works:
Geometry (September 30, 2025)
Angelic desires (November 11, 2025)
Musical works:
Hymn to creation (October 6, 2025)
The Dream (October 15, 2025)
Inherited symphony (October 23, 2025)
Celestial fantasy (November 26, 2025)
Messianic symphony (December 5, 2025)
Narrative Works:
Digital (September 21, 2025)
The Will (October 28, 2025)
Transhuman (November 6, 2025)
Fantasy (November 18, 2025)
Angelic transmission (December 14, 2025)
The new gods (December 24, 2025)
May 4th:
Adam and Mary make the Transhuman Church a global phenomenon.
June 6th:
Adam presents a wide selection of transgenic organisms.
6 of September:
Adam creates plants that function as biofactories.
September, 10th:
Mary begins the phenomenon of Transnaissance (a kind of "post-human" Renaissance, though instead of bringing back the ideas from antiquity, she calls upon the future).

2026
Mary creates artwork such as:
Lyrical work:
Oarion and Diana (January 1, 2026)
Musical work:
Angelic music (January 3, 2026)
Illusions (January 8, 2026)
Universal concert (January 11, 2026)
May 12
Mary wins the Siemens Prize.
June, 15:
Mary wins the Polar Music Award.
October 18:
Mary wins the Praemium Imperiale.
December 26:
Adam creates an avant-garde bioreactor that works like an artificial womb.
December 10:
Adam wins his second Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Mary wins the Nobel Prize for Literature.
Adam and Mary share the Nobel Peace Prize.

2027
July 14:
Adam creates a deep learning system.
2 of September:
Adam improves his line of drugs against aging.
September 23:
Adam creates the cure for degenerative dementia.
September 24:
Adam wins the Crafoord Prize.
December 10:
Mary wins the Nobel Prize for Literature for the second consecutive year.

2028
Mary creates artwork such as:
Virtual reality art:
Society (July 20, 2028) (Digital neighborhood)
EveMart (August 20, 2028) (Customizable digital mall)
February 9:
Mary creates the world's most powerful new supercomputer.
March 9:
Adam creates a human genetic improvement program.
April 20th:
Adam and Mary coinvent the neural interface.
June 9:
Mary creates the new generation of electric batteries.
December 10:
Adam wins his third Nobel Prize in Medicine.

2029
June 24:
Mary wins her fourth Turing Award.
September 1st:
Mary develops state-of-the-art robotic manufacturing processes.
October 18:
Mary wins her second Praemium Imperiale.
November 8th:
Mary wins the Leonardo da Vinci World Arts Prize.
December 10:
Adam and Mary share the Nobel Prize in Physics.
Adam wins his fourth Nobel Prize in Medicine.
Mary wins her third Nobel prize for Literature (Starring a controversy over whether her digital works could be considered literature).

2030
June 6th:
Mary wins her second DARPA award.
August 24:
Adam develops avant-garde molecular cloning processes.
October 3:
Adam patents new treatments for limb transplantation.
November 24:
Adam patents new treatments for head transplant.

2031
Mary creates artwork such as:
The Paradigm (AKA Digitality) (June 6, 2031) (Digital Planet)
January 25:
Mary creates the first viable nuclear fusion reactors.
June 26th:
Adam creates state-of-the-art biofuels.
28 of July:
Mary creates the holoprojector.
December 10:
Adam wins his fifth Nobel Prize in Medicine.

2032
October 18
Mary wins her third Praemium Imperiale.
November 8th:
Mary wins her second world art award Leonardo da Vinci.
December 10:
Adam wins his third Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Mary wins her second Nobel Prize in Physics.

Last edited by Alonsua; 07-20-2017 at 10:10 AM.
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:00 AM   #2
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Default Re: Campaign chronology seeking constructive criticism

A couple of points:
Assuming they founded their megacorp with 1000 employees (which is a ridiculous amount for a starting company), they would have need an annual growth rate of 78% to hit 3 million employees in 14 years. That's a rather ridiculous growth. The company I work for has a 5 year plan to go from 7000 to 17000 employees, and it involves buying a lot of companies and working hard to maintain corporate culture. Adam and Mary have a 2 year plan to accomplish the same growth.

The corporate value of $2T is a little high for 2M employees, but Apple has that value to employee ratio today so it isn't crazy. Just as a note, modern companies with 2 million employees are Walmart, McDonalds, and Britain's National Health Service, and all of them are considerably older than 18 years.

You should probably read the wikipedia article on the Nobel Prize: Mary is unlikely to have won the Literature award twice (it's generally a lifetime achievement award). Adam is unlikely to have repeatedly won the Medicine prize for inventions that are still in the large scale trials page. Similarly with the Turing Prize: there is a 25+ year delay between doing something and getting the award (the 1994 prize, as a randomly selected example, was for work done continuously between 1965 and 1991). They're not going to give it out for something Mary did last year, especially not a new programming language. (I'm assuming that Mary won the 2018 Turing Award for Irdin, not for creating an AI 5 months earlier because the later option doesn't pass the smell test.)

When you say things like October 30, 2018: Adam creates the cancer cure, I'm really confused about what that means. Is that the day he isolates a cure in the lab? The day he creates an economically viable process to manufacture it? The point at which it finished its clinical trials and could be legally distributed? It really takes 3-7 years in the US between the time you submit a drug to the FDA and the time the FDA allows you to distribute it, and no, you can't say "I found a cure for cancer" and they'll believe you. All those trials are meant to determine that you actually did find a cure for cancer and that it works.

Your chronology is improbable at best and features multiple glaring errors that can be discovered by thirty minutes of research at wikipedia. However, it's your game, so you can come up with whatever improbable background you like. My question would be, what does any of this history have to do with the PCs will actually be doing in the game?
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:12 AM   #3
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Default Re: Campaign chronology seeking constructive criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlangsdorf View Post
A couple of points:
Assuming they founded their megacorp with 1000 employees (which is a ridiculous amount for a starting company), they would have need an annual growth rate of 78% to hit 3 million employees in 14 years. That's a rather ridiculous growth. The company I work for has a 5 year plan to go from 7000 to 17000 employees, and it involves buying a lot of companies and working hard to maintain corporate culture. Adam and Mary have a 2 year plan to accomplish the same growth.

The corporate value of $2T is a little high for 2M employees, but Apple has that value to employee ratio today so it isn't crazy. Just as a note, modern companies with 2 million employees are Walmart, McDonalds, and Britain's National Health Service, and all of them are considerably older than 18 years.

You should probably read the wikipedia article on the Nobel Prize: Mary is unlikely to have won the Literature award twice (it's generally a lifetime achievement award). Adam is unlikely to have repeatedly won the Medicine prize for inventions that are still in the large scale trials page. Similarly with the Turing Prize: there is a 25+ year delay between doing something and getting the award (the 1994 prize, as a randomly selected example, was for work done continuously between 1965 and 1991). They're not going to give it out for something Mary did last year, especially not a new programming language. (I'm assuming that Mary won the 2018 Turing Award for Irdin, not for creating an AI 5 months earlier because the later option doesn't pass the smell test.)

When you say things like October 30, 2018: Adam creates the cancer cure, I'm really confused about what that means. Is that the day he isolates a cure in the lab? The day he creates an economically viable process to manufacture it? The point at which it finished its clinical trials and could be legally distributed? It really takes 3-7 years in the US between the time you submit a drug to the FDA and the time the FDA allows you to distribute it, and no, you can't say "I found a cure for cancer" and they'll believe you. All those trials are meant to determine that you actually did find a cure for cancer and that it works.

Your chronology is improbable at best and features multiple glaring errors that can be discovered by thirty minutes of research at wikipedia. However, it's your game, so you can come up with whatever improbable background you like. My question would be, what does any of this history have to do with the PCs will actually be doing in the game?
Hi there and thanks for answering,

when I point the dates I mean the point at which it can be or start to be distributed, could you point some realistic dates at which those prizes could have been won? As for the PCs they could actually do anything they want aslong as it works per the rules, it is a free campaign with lots of computing at the side :)

Ps. I edited the first post in order to add some hard numbers.
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlangsdorf View Post
It really takes 3-7 years in the US between the time you submit a drug to the FDA and the time the FDA allows you to distribute it, and no, you can't say "I found a cure for cancer" and they'll believe you. All those trials are meant to determine that you actually did find a cure for cancer and that it works.
Plus that it doesn´t have too many nasty side effects. Remember Thalidomid ?
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:27 AM   #5
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Default Re: Campaign chronology seeking constructive criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonsua View Post
two bioengineered polymaths with an overall IQ of about 180 (they have around 220 in their respective fields of work).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonsua View Post
would greatly appreciate maintaining a certain level of realism in this.
You're already way off the 'realism' mark.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonsua View Post
30th of October:
Adam creates the cancer cure.
In addition to the questions mlangsdorf raised, another good one is 'For which cancer?' One of the fundamental issues with cancer research is that what the general public calls 'cancer' is really a bunch of similar cell growth diseases with myriad causes that can affect virtually any organ in the body. A treatment for skin cancer can't be applied to a brain cancer; a lung cancer treatment will do nothing for a different lung cancer, never mind cancer of the liver or stomach. A blanket 'cancer cure' based on anything like existing 2018 technology is as realistic as a Cure Disease spell, and would need (much) higher TL medical scanners and targeted, programmable nanobots.

I've snipped the rest: the specific list of awards is pretty fundamentally impossible based on even a casual reading of what those awards are given for, and the idea of so many new drugs, treatments, and technologies going from concept to general use in such a short span of time is definitely not within the bounds of realism. This doesn't mean it can't serve as a campaign background: fiction is full of this sort of thing (the Umbrella Corporation, OMNI Consumer Products, Weyland-Yutani, Veidt Industries), but the concept's lack of realism is accepted as a genre trope because if you try to look too closely, it doesn't hold up.

I'm genuinely confused about what you're going for here: as campaign background, this is far more detail than you need, and you might be much better served deciding what sorts of challenges you want your PCs to face - what kind of stories you're looking to tell - than by determining the exhaustive list of accolades showered on a couple of background NPCs for the game.
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Last edited by Harald387; 07-20-2017 at 07:36 AM.
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:45 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Harald387 View Post
You're already way off the 'realism' mark.



In addition to the questions mlangsdorf raised, another good one is 'For which cancer?' One of the fundamental issues with cancer research is that what the general public calls 'cancer' is really a bunch of similar cell growth diseases with myriad causes that can affect virtually any organ in the body. A treatment for skin cancer can't be applied to a brain cancer; a lung cancer treatment will do nothing for a different lung cancer, never mind cancer of the liver or stomach. A blanket 'cancer cure' based on anything like existing 2018 technology is as realistic as a Cure Disease spell, and would need (much) higher TL medical scanners and targeted, programmable nanobots.

I've snipped the rest: the specific list of awards is pretty fundamentally impossible based on even a casual reading of what those awards are given for, and the idea of so many new drugs, treatments, and technologies going from concept to general use in such a short span of time is definitely not within the bounds of realism. This doesn't mean it can't serve as a campaign background: fiction is full of this sort of thing (the Umbrella Corporation, OMNI Consumer Products, Weyland-Yutani, Veidt Industries), but the concept's lack of realism is accepted as a genre trope because if you try to look too closely, it doesn't hold up.

I'm genuinely confused about what you're going for here: as campaign background, this is far more detail than you need, and you might be much better served deciding what sorts of challenges you want your PCs to face - what kind of stories you're looking to tell - than by determining the exhaustive list of accolades showered on a couple of background NPCs for the game.
Hi there and thank you,

Yes it is a general cure for cancer that mainly attacks the metastases, and it's a campaign scenario (a parallel universe where to play if that is better worded) where the players can play in as they want, a kind of "sims" :)

Ps. They are developing new technology successfully all the time, hence the conglomerate has grown so drastically (I'm using the algorithm of New Inventions in the Campaign Set with realistic character builds). What type of prizes/awards and on which dates would you realistically grant them?
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Old 07-20-2017, 07:57 AM   #7
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Formally, the computing prize is the "A. M. Turing Award". (Not "prize", though people do usually drop the initials in actual use.)

More importantly, the Turing Award is not really a lifetime achievement award. Selection criteria call for "a particular outstanding and trend-setting technical achievement that constitutes the principal claim to the award", though it's true that "long-term influences of the nominee's work are taken into consideration". It's possible or even likely that it's really just one significant piece of work that wins the award.

(For example, the most recent recipient is Tim Berners-Lee, for the Web. The core idea there is just "lets post information in a markup language", which language they didn't even invent. The outstanding and trend-setting bits of that idea only became apparent later, and most of the work that supports the Web was not done by Berners-Lee or his team. He didn't do anything else that I've ever heard of, and didn't even do that much to build the Web as it actually exists. That's not to diminish his work or say that he's undeserving of the award -- just an illustration that it's not an award for a lifetime of solid sustained multiple achievements in computer science like Dijkstra or Thompson/Ritchie. Even for those sorts, the award citation is for one specific contribution.)

The delay is common enough, though I think that has as much to do with the time for the value of an idea to become widespread and well-recognized by all the people that have to vote for the award, as opposed to the geniuses that come up with the ideas. (Vincent Cerf, for example, for his early work on TCP/IP and the Internet protocols in general -- late 60s / early 70s work only awarded in 2004. But it wasn't until the 90s that the IP stack even became utterly dominant, not to mention networking becoming ubiquitous. An award in 1978 or 1985 would have been really unlikely, much less obvious, and perhaps not even deserved had history gone another way. There were a lot of networking stacks, and TCP/IP isn't even the most technologically advanced or clever.) Some really significant work (like demonstration of a true general-purpose AI) might get recognized faster. But the one-year delay in the timeline in the OP does seem pretty short.

I don't think there's ever been a multiple award-winner for the Turing. It's not prohibited, and significantly different work (like inventing AI as well as a new sort of computer architecture) might qualify. It's not forbidden, at least. But that's also covered up by the time delay. 20 or 30 years after, the additional contributions would probably be seen just as confirmation that Mary really was deserving, not given their own awards. But as long as we're being cinematic, perhaps Mary can be the first and only multiple Turing winner.

As for the corporation size -- I don't think there is a company that's quite in the 3 million mark. Wal-mart and McDonalds are the largest two, if we don't count government entities like armies or the UK NHS. And note that those companies are the sort with a lot of individual brick-and-mortar retail outlets and distribution, not engineering companies. They're not 3 million genius engineers working on new products. Apple is only around 116,000, Microsoft about that, Google half that. Transhuman International apparently does literally everything, so it seems reasonable that it could blow the roof off the usual total numbers -- but that's because it's truly a megacorporation doing everything in every nation, not because of its technological innovation.

Last edited by Anaraxes; 07-20-2017 at 08:00 AM.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:18 AM   #8
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Default Re: Campaign chronology seeking constructive criticism

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaraxes View Post
Formally, the computing prize is the "A. M. Turing Award". (Not "prize", though people do usually drop the initials in actual use.)

More importantly, the Turing Award is not really a lifetime achievement award. Selection criteria call for "a particular outstanding and trend-setting technical achievement that constitutes the principal claim to the award", though it's true that "long-term influences of the nominee's work are taken into consideration". It's possible or even likely that it's really just one significant piece of work that wins the award.

(For example, the most recent recipient is Tim Berners-Lee, for the Web. The core idea there is just "lets post information in a markup language", which language they didn't even invent. The outstanding and trend-setting bits of that idea only became apparent later, and most of the work that supports the Web was not done by Berners-Lee or his team. He didn't do anything else that I've ever heard of, and didn't even do that much to build the Web as it actually exists. That's not to diminish his work or say that he's undeserving of the award -- just an illustration that it's not an award for a lifetime of solid sustained multiple achievements in computer science like Dijkstra or Thompson/Ritchie. Even for those sorts, the award citation is for one specific contribution.)

The delay is common enough, though I think that has as much to do with the time for the value of an idea to become widespread and well-recognized by all the people that have to vote for the award, as opposed to the geniuses that come up with the ideas. (Vincent Cerf, for example, for his early work on TCP/IP and the Internet protocols in general -- late 60s / early 70s work only awarded in 2004. But it wasn't until the 90s that the IP stack even became utterly dominant, not to mention networking becoming ubiquitous. An award in 1978 or 1985 would have been really unlikely, much less obvious, and perhaps not even deserved had history gone another way. There were a lot of networking stacks, and TCP/IP isn't even the most technologically advanced or clever.) Some really significant work (like demonstration of a true general-purpose AI) might get recognized faster. But the one-year delay in the timeline in the OP does seem pretty short.

I don't think there's ever been a multiple award-winner for the Turing. It's not prohibited, and significantly different work (like inventing AI as well as a new sort of computer architecture) might qualify. It's not forbidden, at least. But that's also covered up by the time delay. 20 or 30 years after, the additional contributions would probably be seen just as confirmation that Mary really was deserving, not given their own awards. But as long as we're being cinematic, perhaps Mary can be the first and only multiple Turing winner.

As for the corporation size -- I don't think there is a company that's quite in the 3 million mark. Wal-mart and McDonalds are the largest two, if we don't count government entities like armies or the UK NHS. And note that those companies are the sort with a lot of individual brick-and-mortar retail outlets and distribution, not engineering companies. They're not 3 million genius engineers working on new products. Apple is only around 116,000, Microsoft about that, Google half that. Transhuman International apparently does literally everything, so it seems reasonable that it could blow the roof off the usual total numbers -- but that's because it's truly a megacorporation doing everything in every nation, not because of its technological innovation.
Hi there and thanks for elaborating,

I have changed all those to "Turing Award". I wanted to point that nor do all employees engage in research and development, for example LilyCare Inc. is at the head of 1.172 hospitals and EveTech Inc. has a whole virtual planet to maintain and runs 1.740 factories around the globe :)
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:21 AM   #9
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Quote:
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Transhuman International Inc. (year 2032)
Employees: 3.076.235
Assets: 2.490.368.000$
Gross sales: 24.594.184.363.610$
Operating profit: 284.688.384.000$
Industries
Aerospace, agriculture, chemical, computer, construction, defense, energy, entertainment, food, health, manufacturing and mass media.

The conglomerate is subdivided into three major branches:
Transhuman church (Entertainment and mass media)
Employees: 146.000 Assets: 113.880.000.000$
LilyCare (Agriculture, chemical, energy, food, health and manufacturing)
Employees: 1.384.042 Assets: 1.122.734.870.400$
EveTech (Aerospace, computer, construction, defense, energy and manufacturing)
Employees: 1.546.193 Assets: 1.254.271.600$
These numbers are nonsense. On a couple of different levels.

* First, no company with 3 million employees knows how many people it employs to 7 significant digits. It might know it to 4, so the employee count should be 3076000
* Similarly, they don't know their profit, sales, or assets down to the thousands of dollars. They might know it to the millions.
* You said they had $2 trillion is assets, and gave them $2.5 billion in assets. I think that's a typo.
* They have $25 trillion in gross sales (typo?). World GDP in 2017 was ~$126 trillion; assuming a 4% growth rate worldwide for the next 20 years, world GDP should be about $227 trillion, so they're supplying 1/9th the world's GDP, making them roughly equal to modern day China or the US (~1/6th the GDP each). That's a little nuts.
* They only have $284 billion in operating profit for a 1.2% profit margin, which means they have the same profit margin as a grocery store.
* The asset values for the various subgroups don't add up in any way: they're not sales, they're not assets, they're not operating profits. They're just a bunch of random numbers. Subgroup employees do sum to total employees, so that's a plus.

As far as your cure for cancer:
"Yes it is a general cure for cancer that mainly attacks the metastases." There are plenty of cancers that will be happy to kill you without metastasizing. I immediately think of thyroid cancer because it can choke you to death without metastasizing off the thyroid. And metastases are just breakaway bits of the original cancer that have settled somewhere else in the body: saying that you're attacking the metastases doesn't address Harald387's point that cancer is a bunch of different, unrelated diseases. The metastases are still a bunch of different, unrelated diseases and the fact that you can kill metastasized thyroid cancer cells with Iodine-131 doesn't mean you can do the same with metastasized breast cancer cells.

I want to echo Harald387's point:
"I'm genuinely confused about what you're going for here: as campaign background, this is far more detail than you need, and you might be much better served deciding what sorts of challenges you want your PCs to face - what kind of stories you're looking to tell - than by determining the exhaustive list of accolades showered on a couple of background NPCs for the game. "

Finally, to answer the question on the prizes they would have been awarded:
* Adam may get the Nobel in Medicine for the cancer cure in 2026, but 2030 or later is more likely.
* Mary might get a Turing Award in 2032 for inventing AI in 2019. Maybe.
* Neither of them are likely to have gotten Nobels or Crafoords in Chemistry, Literature, or any of the fields you get Crafoords for. (Maybe? You never indicate why Adam would have gotten Nobels in Chemistry or what field or for what work he got a Crafoord). Multiple awards in 14 years are really unlikely but Madame Curie did it so I'm not going to rule it out. Of course, she did it in two fields, not twice in the same field.
* It's possible that Mary may have gotten a Praemium Imperiale but it seems unlikely.
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Old 07-20-2017, 09:15 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Alonsua View Post
Hi there and thanks for elaborating,

I have changed all those to "Turing Award". I wanted to point that nor do all employees engage in research and development, for example LilyCare Inc. is at the head of 1.172 hospitals and EveTech Inc. has a whole virtual planet to maintain and runs 1.740 factories around the globe :)
Ascension Health is a US, Roman Catholic health care association with 131 hospitals and 150.000 employees. Scaling that out to 1.172 hospitals, and assuming LilyCare is 3x as efficient as Ascension Health*, means that nearly a quarter of LilyCare's employees work in healthcare. Since "health and manufacturing" is last of the list of LilyCare's industries, it's reasonable to expect that the other fields have more employees devoted to them, and that LilyCare should have even more employees.

* What with a 5-7 year lead time between when you come up with a medical breakthrough and the earliest you can start distributing it, plus the fact that the health care field has been notoriously difficult to make more efficient for years, I really doubt that LilyCare is 3x as efficient as Ascension Health. 2x is pushing it. Even on the most generous reading of the dates, they've only had neural interfaces 4-5 years, so they're still rolling them out to their 500K+ employees.
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