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Old 02-23-2011, 01:05 PM   #91
sir_pudding
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

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Originally Posted by Langy View Post
Because if you fail the test, you fall unconscious immediately - you don't get to take your maneuver.
If you make the test why bother to take Do Nothing then? What's the point of Do Nothing? I originally thought that you could opt to take Do Nothing instead of having to roll, but that isn't the case. Or is it?
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:06 PM   #92
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

The instant you're injured to 0 HP or less: No matter what maneuver you selected before being injured, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness. Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – is beside the point.

Turns after you're injured to 0 HP or less: If you select any maneuver but Do Nothing, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness before you take action. If you select Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – you do not have to roll but of course have no action to take.

That is, my clarification was of the two offending sentences. The Do Nothing exception isn't in either of them, and works as it always did: It lets you avoid a HT roll. But that's neither here nor there in what I was trying to clarify. The whole rule would be:
0 HP or less – You are in immediate danger of collapse. In addition to the above effects, make an immediate HT roll, at -1 per full multiple of HP below zero. Failure means you fall unconscious (or simply stop working, if you weren’t truly alive or conscious in the first place); see Recovering from Unconsciousness (p. 423). Success means you can act normally, but must roll again at the start of every turn to continue functioning. Exception: If you choose Do Nothing on your turn, and do not attempt any defense rolls, you can remain conscious without rolling. Roll only on turns during which you attempt a defense roll or choose a maneuver other than Do Nothing.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:08 PM   #93
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

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Originally Posted by Kromm View Post
The instant you're injured to 0 HP or less: No matter what maneuver you selected before being injured, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness if your HP fall to 0 or less. Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – is beside the point.
So I had this wrong.
Quote:
Turns after you're injured to 0 HP or less: If you select any maneuver but Do Nothing, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness before you take action. If you select Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – you do not have to roll but of course have no action to take.
But this right.

Okay.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:08 PM   #94
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

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Originally Posted by sir_pudding View Post
If you make the test why bother to take Do Nothing then? What's the point of Do Nothing? I originally thought that you could opt to take Do Nothing instead of having to roll, but that isn't the case. Or is it?
No, you can choose to take the Do Nothing maneuver instead of testing against HT. This doesn't mean that the test occurs after the maneuver happens - it just means that if you choose to Do Nothing, you can avoid the test. If you choose *not* to Do Nothing, then you have to pass the HT check in order to do anything else that turn.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:11 PM   #95
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

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Originally Posted by Langy View Post
No, you can choose to take the Do Nothing maneuver instead of testing against HT. This doesn't mean that the test occurs after the maneuver happens - it just means that if you choose to Do Nothing, you can avoid the test. If you choose *not* to Do Nothing, then you have to pass the HT check in order to do anything else that turn.
Yes, I get that from Kromm's most recent post. That's the way I've always done it. What confused me was in Kromm's rewrite, the emphasis on "start of your turn" made it seem like you have to roll before choosing a Maneuver, which isn't the case.
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Old 02-23-2011, 02:49 PM   #96
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

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Originally Posted by Kromm View Post
The instant you're injured to 0 HP or less: No matter what maneuver you selected before being injured, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness. Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – is beside the point.

Turns after you're injured to 0 HP or less: If you select any maneuver but Do Nothing, you must roll vs. HT to avoid unconsciousness before you take action. If you select Do Nothing – as a choice on that turn or as a consequence of something else – you do not have to roll but of course have no action to take.
Which was what I've been saying all along.
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Old 02-23-2011, 04:16 PM   #97
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

So, the answer to my OP question is
The victim has 12HP and 12HT:
Turn#1 he gets shot twice
First shot is Vitals for 30 injury = -18HP, succeed HT check or die and then check HT @-5 or suffer Knockdown
Second is Vitals for 24 injury = -42HP, succeed HT check or die Twice, once for -2xHP and again for -3xHP, and then check HT @-5 for Knockdown.
Assuming he's still alive and conscious after the above, he tries an immediate HT check @-3 or falls unconscious; if he succeeds this one he can act, but at -4 to DX and IQ from the Shock, and at half move and dodge from <1/3 HP.
Turn#2
(assume his attacker is scooting)
If the victim chooses to do anything other than Do Nothing, he has to make another HT check @-3 or fall unconscious but, if he succeeds, at least the shock will have worn off.
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Old 02-23-2011, 04:42 PM   #98
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

If I'm reading Kromm's previous post correctly you test against HT vs unconsciousness the instant you hit 0hp or less. So for shot 1 you first test against HT at -1 to avoid going unconscious. Then test HT to avoid dying etc.

For shot 2 there's an additional test against HT at -3 to avoid going unconscious again. Then test HT to avoid dying etc.

On turn 2 you must test against HT-3 or go unconscious if you take any maneuver outside of Do Nothing.

edit: I think, the more I read through the rules the more I second guess my take on it.

Last edited by Comedian; 02-23-2011 at 04:48 PM.
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Old 02-23-2011, 05:10 PM   #99
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

I know what you mean but it does seem kind of illogical to check for consciousness and then death - I mean, if you're dead, who cares if you succeed the consciousness checks or not.
As for more than once - the original rule made the check at the start of your following turn. I think it's painful enough to add it in as the first thing you do after being injured and before doing anything else. After all, the character might already be dead. Hence, I'm interpreting the immediate consciousness check for HP0 or less to mean immediately after any other checks and before you try to continue with anything else, thereby keeping it as one roll.

The aesthetic change the immediate makes will be that if Bob gets shot as he runs across an alley, he will probably fall down more/less where he was shot, not his full move afterwards (unless he manages to succeed all those HT checks).

Now that's another question - if you're running across, whatever, and get shot halfway through your move (triggered Op-fire) and reduced to 1/2 move (1/3HP or less), does that leave you 1/4 move to go...
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Old 02-23-2011, 05:32 PM   #100
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Default Re: Overkill on a Mozambique drill

I'm not sure you take it more than once, it was just the initial impression I got when I read "in addition to the above affects" next to the -1xHP bullet point on B419. But I'm thinking I misread that and you only test once against HT vs Unconsciousness in the fashion that you posted originally, because the text seems to imply that it's only ever one roll per turn.
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