Steve Jackson Games - Site Navigation
Home General Info Follow Us Search Illuminator Store Forums What's New Other Games Ogre GURPS Munchkin Our Games: Home

Go Back   Steve Jackson Games Forums > Roleplaying > Roleplaying in General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-07-2016, 01:35 PM   #31
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by lwcamp View Post

But if you still reject Greek sources, note that the dwarfs of Scandinavian mythology displayed abundant creativity in the realm of invention and construction. Of their own device and volition, they produced Mjolnir (Thor's hammer), Gleipnir (the ribbon that bound the Fenris wolf), Skidbladnir (a magical ship that can fold up and fit in a pocket), Gungnir (Odin's spear that never missed), Draupnir (a golden armband that could multiply itself), and many others. They were renowned for their craftmanship even among the gods.

Luke
True...but the begs the question of whether Dwarves are or should be seen in the same category as elves. (I use Tolkien's preferred spellings deliberately, for the same reason he did.) The Summer/Winter Court are elves, or Sidhe if you prefer, Dwarves are different, or at least seem to be looked at differently, in the old folklore.
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 07:51 PM   #32
David Johnston2
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
True...but the begs the question of whether Dwarves are or should be seen in the same category as elves. (I use Tolkien's preferred spellings deliberately, for the same reason he did.) The Summer/Winter Court are elves, or Sidhe if you prefer, Dwarves are different, or at least seem to be looked at differently, in the old folklore.
Not really. Bear in mind that that the actual name of the "dwarves" from Norse mythology is "svartalfar". Dwarves are the original "dark elves".
David Johnston2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 08:24 PM   #33
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Johnston2 View Post
Not really. Bear in mind that that the actual name of the "dwarves" from Norse mythology is "svartalfar". Dwarves are the original "dark elves".
Maybe. But the myths, even with the limited sample we have, aren't always clear on that. Sometimes they appear to make a distinction between 'dwarf' and 'dark elf'. Sometimes they blur the distinction between light-elf and dark-elf. Sometimes it's not clear whether the Vanir and the elves are the same or different.
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2016, 10:24 PM   #34
lwcamp
 
lwcamp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: The plutonium rich regions of Washington State
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
True...but the begs the question of whether Dwarves are or should be seen in the same category as elves. (I use Tolkien's preferred spellings deliberately, for the same reason he did.) The Summer/Winter Court are elves, or Sidhe if you prefer, Dwarves are different, or at least seem to be looked at differently, in the old folklore.
Alright, let's go Celtic. Brigid of the Tuatha De Danann. A goddess-elf of poetry, arts, crafts, and smithing. To quite from Wikipedia "Cormac's Glossary, written in the 10th century by Christian monks, says that Brigid was 'the goddess whom poets adored'". She was said to have invented the whistle.

Also Celtic: When Lugh traveled to join king Nuada, he was asked what he add to offer to the king's service. Lugh replied, in turn, of his skill as a wright, a smith, a champion, a swordsman, a harpist, a hero, a poet and historian, a sorcerer, and a craftsman. Since Nuada's court already had one of each, Lugh was turned away.

Now the Tuatha de Danann are about as elfish as you can get. Magical people from the before time who live in hidden places under the hills; whose world sometimes intersects our own in the lost and wild places of the world, or at the turning of the seasons when the boundaries of reality are weak. And they were apparently expert harpists and poets, artists and craftsmen (and craftswomen, in the case of Brigid).

Luke
lwcamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2017, 07:01 PM   #35
KarlKost
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Brazil
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Hi everybody, sorry for going a little necromantic here, but I love the Fae, and I'm also a huge fan of both GURPS (the best) and WoD (mostly the old), so, is any of you familiar with Changelling the Lost, from the Chronicles of Darkness? (the new World of Darkness)

I loved that game, and in my opinion it made an awesome job at creating alienish beings with total alien behavior that aren't just flat evil (like demons) or simply bestial (like the famous movie Alien).

In a very short resume, you could say that the True Fae from this game are like cosmical forces connected to Fate, and they take their nourishment from Tales - they MUST pit themselves against one another in order to exist. Without struggle, they simply cease to be. But not just physical fight - they need to create LEGENDS. In order to do so, they kidnap humans, and enslave them, twisting their captivities slowly in their Realms, until they are humans no longer.

And they thrive on their otherwordly tortures of their slaves. Because, when a slave rebels and flee from captivity, new legends are born.

To keep those, the SAME Fae can HELP and HINDER the SAME changelling (those former slaves, no longer humans, twisted by their unnatural time under their alien Masters). In one tale, a True Fae may show as your "Guardian Fae", turning the huge pumpkim into a beautiful White Porshe 3.0, but in the other moment, that same Fae curses you to sleep until a Prince losses you softly.

Those Fae fight amongst themselves an arcane immortals game, with likewise arcane rules, and without any human's morals; two True Fae will sort of "bet", for example, on the actions of a mortal or a changelling; for example "If I make him despise his true love and murder her, I Win, but if he does not, we both lose, but if he kills Her while still loving her, you will".

After that bet, both fairies will go take their places on the tale; basically, they take masks to Interact with the protagonists (the poor mortals). Each Fae can assume only a limited amount of forms:

- One Avatar - The Fae can show itself like the Gandalf old-wise, the seductive succubus, the huge giant, the Dragon, the fragile Princess, whatever
- One Object - The One Ring, the sword Excalibur, the Nibelungen's ring, Alladim's Lamp, whatever
- One "Horde" - a multitude of creatures, they are a legion, hard to kill and tough things, however, they are not as powerful as the Avatar, and neither can the horde hoast the bulk of the Fae's conscious toughts. The Hosts of Heaven, the Legions of Hell, the swarm of Aliens
- One Realm - The Fae is also an entire Realm, where all laws abide to its personality. The Fae, however, can't change the Law of Hospitality - anyone that enters the Realm must have a way of unlocking its mysteries and reaching its goals (the Fae can't simply make the Realm into a Black Hole that destroys anyone who enters it, althouth it can make the Realm into a wild hell, filled with Sphinx-Demons ready to destroy anyone unable to solve its mysteries). All those Realms have some connection and coherence with the purposes of the tales, and therefore, there must be a way to solve it (the Fae could make the guests arive in the Moon, but they would be able to breath there, and a magical boat would show to carry them to the Castle of the Lord of the Land where the kidnapped Princess is being held).
Realms would be like the world of Alice and such

Fae are constantly struggling in those immortal games (they must, otherwise they cease to be). When a Fae defeat another in a game, it devours one of it's Titles (the Names of the Fae are their essences). For example, the Dragon Fafnir, that may be one of the Avatars of one True Fae. If another devours this Title, it will gain both the name and the new actor (it can Now call itself "X Fae of ZYW Titles, and also, the mighty Dragon Fafnir - and, it will be able to impersonate the Mighty dragon on any future Tale).

What I like about those, is that they are good for Angels, Demons, Fae, Spirits and even UFOs... When a swarm of Greys take you for their spaceships to make unholy things to you, it may be the swarm aspect of one True Fae...
KarlKost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2017, 10:09 PM   #36
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlKost View Post

and even UFOs... When a swarm of Greys take you for their spaceships to make unholy things to you, it may be the swarm aspect of one True Fae...
A lot of people have observed that there are strong parallels between UFO abduction stories and Medieval stories of Fae encounters, to the point that some believe they are the same phenomenon, either as a psychological matter or some reality that is occurring.
__________________
HMS Overflow-For conversations off topic here.
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2017, 08:22 AM   #37
KarlKost
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Brazil
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
A lot of people have observed that there are strong parallels between UFO abduction stories and Medieval stories of Fae encounters, to the point that some believe they are the same phenomenon, either as a psychological matter or some reality that is occurring.
Well, for people that believe in the UFO phenomenon, I guess they would say that all those tales about Fae (and similar myth) would be a way to explain the UFO by people that couldn't possibly know better. For those who don't believe in it, it would be a different form of schizofrenia (I know this is offensive for any one who may be an ufologist, I asure it's not my intention, but I have no way around it; but my point is not about belief in here).

I, personally, love that close relantionship that those tales share (no matter if its real or not). I love to play UFO/FAE as the same phenomenon in my games - in a SciFi setting, Fae are just myths by low tech civilization to explain UFOs; in an Urban Fantasy, UFOs are just a kind of Fae, or are the way that modern people (infected by their "Science") see the modern Fae.

I also think that that's the way to look at Fae, is to give them some kind of inhuman purposes; it must be something beyond just our biological evolution (survive, reproduce). I liked the Fae of Changelling the Lost because they are NOT just random; they have clear, logical purposes (survival, the most basic logic necessity for ANY being). Its just not a LINEAR logic - by the way, our own psychic is not always linear - but its always logic. Even behaviors that we may think are completely ilogical, have a deeper logic - and, in most cases, even an evolutionary purpose. Behaviors like schizofrenia, suicidal impulses, depressive behavior - all those, at first glance, seem conterproductive to any individual, thus, we would expect them to be "removed" during our evolution times in the caves. However, many of those are, in fact, POSITIVE traits, in an evolutionary point of view. Its strange, but the logic behind it is not clearly at sight (some mental diseases are the product of bad genetics however, just like a bad heart, so in those cases are NOT what I refer here. But, something like depression, however, as terrible as it is for the individual, its a "good" trait for evolution).

When thinking on Fae, we must use this kind of "layers of logic". In fact, I would like some help in this, in creating this kind of logic for alien beings. Could you guys help me in this exercise?

Ok, lets do this. So, lets try to give life to those non linear purposes.

First premisses:

Fae, like any being, struggle for survival.
However:
- They may (or may not) have higher purposes than just their own immediate survival.
1. Selfish beings only care for themselves. Like beasts who eat their own offspring, and act only for their own survival
2. Social beings may have "altruistic" behaviors (under quotes, because that altruism of individuals is just a kind of selfishness of the genes. That's a scientific discutission of evolution that doesn't matter that much here and now; suffice is to say, individuals can have behaviors beyond the self interest).
So, Fae could "die for the King" or "the Kingdom"
KarlKost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2017, 11:38 PM   #38
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlKost View Post

When thinking on Fae, we must use this kind of "layers of logic". In fact, I would like some help in this, in creating this kind of logic for alien beings. Could you guys help me in this exercise?

Ok, lets do this. So, lets try to give life to those non linear purposes.

First premisses:

Fae, like any being, struggle for survival.
However:
- They may (or may not) have higher purposes than just their own immediate survival.
1. Selfish beings only care for themselves. Like beasts who eat their own offspring, and act only for their own survival
2. Social beings may have "altruistic" behaviors (under quotes, because that altruism of individuals is just a kind of selfishness of the genes. That's a scientific discutission of evolution that doesn't matter that much here and now; suffice is to say, individuals can have behaviors beyond the self interest).
The idea that all altruism is simply an expression of genetic self-interest is easy to disprove, but that's not the issue here. Here's an example of how fae could be very alien to humans.

Suppose, for example, that Fae don't 'reproduce' in our sense at all. Instead, Fae are semi-spiritual beings derived from some supernatural source. Such a race of Fae might actually have more in common, psychologically, with sapient robots than with humans, at least to a degree.

They might share some biological needs with us. They might, for ex, need food and water, even if their origins are entirely supernatural. So Fae might share our biological impulse of hunger and their psychology be like ours to that extent. But they might normally only engage in sex purely for pleasure, esp. if they are infertile with each other. Life in Fairie might bear a slight resemblance to human teenage fantasies in that sense.

But suppose such Fae were still fertile...with us. All of a sudden a lot of the stories about the fickle, unpredictable nature of the Fae in their romantic relationships with us might begin to make some sense...

Another way Fae could be profoundly alien to us: suppose they are immortal. I mean literally immortal, all the way unkillable. Their supernatural nature might mean that even if you vaporize a Sidhe, it'll reform over time and return. In that way they might be a little like Tolkien's Ainur (and indeed, in some versions of his mythology, the Sidhe are extremely minor Ainur).

So you've got a superficially human-like creature who cannot be permanently destroyed. They might still feel pain and behave superficially like us. They might try to avoid being shot or stabbed or immolated, because that hurts, but at the same time, they know they will survive whatever is about to be done to them, no matter what. Even if you tie one to a 20 megaton nuke and fire it off, he'll return in a few days or years or whatever.

Flip side of that: forms of death that are quick and painless might hold little terror to them, it's just an inconvenience at most, after all. So you get the legendary Sidhe indifference to danger. Alvion the Fairie Lord might think nothing of driving stealing a souped-up racer, driving it up the one-lane mountain road at 120 mph, swerving half off the road near a cliff to avoid oncoming traffic, and so on...because what's the worst that could happen?

Here too we get the notorious Sidhe unpredictability. Creatures immune to death might well not be all that empathetic to others in that regard. The Sidhe might casually engage in lethal violence with each other, since the outcome is temporary. They might also not be able to comprehend the human dread of and respect for death, either...

When you're going to be in this world until the End, Time becomes kind of an abstraction, too. Here we get the notorious danger of time warping. Sidhe might not understand why imprisoning a human for 100 years in a time warp is so dire a deed. "What's he so upset about. I was locked in the crystal cage for a 1000 years when I lost the Great Game, he's only been trapped for 50 years..."

Of course to that mortal, 50 years is time enough for his wife to die of old age, his children to grow up and have children of their own and maybe grandkids, for his home town and home country to change substantially, his friends to be gone, his house long since torn down and replaced by a other things, etc.

Sidhe society might not change recognizably in centuries or millennia, human societies are not so stable. The Sidhe might not even mean any harm when they take actions that throw a human decades or centuries out of his time...

Now one more thing: suppose these Sidhe actually can permanently die...from contact with iron...

All of a sudden a lot of legends about Sidhe behavior suddenly make sense.
__________________
HMS Overflow-For conversations off topic here.
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2017, 06:16 PM   #39
KarlKost
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Brazil
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Hmm... Thank you Johnny, I loved those ideas

I'm going to include a few of those in a game of Fairies that Im planning... I loved the unkillable concept

Im also thinking on making a few of their powers based on Impulse Buys, so, they would have an amount of "permanent" Impulse Points (15 pts/lvl), and each one of those would give 1 "temporary" Impulse Point (it wont be named as such, but it is that concept derived from Power Ups 5, but I'll limit the use of those to not include changes in dice results). Those points would be the bases for their "magick", actually, it will be more like a "reality recreation", since I'll have the Fae is a sort of magical beings from the Primal force of Magic that created the world. They'll also be the weavers of Fate, so, their base power dissolves and recreate reality; I found that Impulse Buys are perfect for such. I would also have a kind of "karmic" experience increase; the Fae CAN'T get new XP, no matter what, but they can change themselves using the power of Fate. So, they can use their "temporary IP points" (the ones they haven't spent during the session) as points of experience... At a price. Because, Fate always charges a price. So, any points they use to increase themselves, they also gain the same amount as "Dark Fate" (disadvantages - or lost advantages. So, for example, the Fae can save 10 of his IP points to increase a skill/atribute/ability/whatever, but now must also get a -10 disadvantage, or lose his 10 points ally, for example).

All Fae in this game of mine will have what I call "karma balance";

that means:

If your sheet says that your char has 200 points... Thats what it will have - no matter what.

So, if the PC loses an ally, or if has his hand cut off

Fate will be kind... The points he gets from those disadvantages, he will get to spend on other traits.

But, when the Fae tries to bend the destiny to gain power

Fate is cruel.

Each session, the GM will give the players "Fate Points".

Those will be the real "XP" of the players. But with a little difference.

Those Fate Points can ONLY buy disadvantages off.


So... What's really the difference?

Its a matter of theme.

In this version Im building, the Fae can't really learn... They are, indeed, like sapient robots more or less.

They dont grow in learning; they reprogram themselves. They use their Magic to gain profeciency where there were none.

The Fate Points are NOT experience; they are, rather, a kind of "fateful push". The Fae that can successefully get over their obstacles, is favored by destiny. "You rescued the Princess and became the King. Fate smiles at you, and your delusions, paranoia and bloodlust are healed as you sense destiny favoring you"

That means that, eventually, your deepest love will turn into your most bitter enemy (first you lose your ally, than that former ally becomes your enemy, all that so you can become more powerful).

Thats why the Fae have insane love stories; they do love, with all their heart. But, they know that every relation is ephemeral. They love with all their heart (or they become totally callous), only to be tired of their affection in the next time; dont get attached to any one, it will end bitterly, so, enjoy while you can. In fact, that makes them tragic creatures, bound by their fates.

This also makes family relation almost impossible; therefore, the Fae doesn't know parental care at all; I was thinking in making the reproduction more of a social norm than something desirable (so, Fae that don't reproduce for too long, specially during summer/winter time, according to court, would get a social stigma).

In this scenario I propose, can anybody see any other profound psychological mark that the Fae would have?
KarlKost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2017, 07:53 PM   #40
KarlKost
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Brazil
Default Re: [Spoilers?] Blue and Orange Morality: Adapting the Faerie Courts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Suppose, for example, that Fae don't 'reproduce' in our sense at all. Instead, Fae are semi-spiritual beings derived from some supernatural source. Such a race of Fae might actually have more in common, psychologically, with sapient robots than with humans, at least to a degree.

They might share some biological needs with us. They might, for ex, need food and water, even if their origins are entirely supernatural. So Fae might share our biological impulse of hunger and their psychology be like ours to that extent. But they might normally only engage in sex purely for pleasure, esp. if they are infertile with each other. Life in Fairie might bear a slight resemblance to human teenage fantasies in that sense.
I want to have 3 kinds of Fae (its an adaptation from Dark Age's Fae, a game from World of Darkness)
- The Firstborn, those will be born from the Primal Magic that gives shape to all things, so, they are Primal beings of pure Magic (Primal gods and monsters, like Zeus, Anubis, but also minor beings, like Harpies, Ciclops and so on)
- The Inanime, Fae born from the elements (so, the Djinn would be Inanime Fae born from the fire element, for example, and Dryads would be Fae born from wood, and so on, Frost and Fire Giants from norse myth, even the titanic beings that are as powerful as the Gods, like Ymir or Surtur; but animals also fit here, like the Myrmidons, ants transformed into the perfect soldiers by Zeus)
- Changellings, those are the Fae with human "blood", when a human baby is exchanged with a Fae baby, both will give origin to a Changelling; or the offspring of Fae and human, or Changellings and any other Fae; also, a human slave that eats Fae food, after a time in faery lands will become a Changelling too. Examples could be like Larachnia, the greek weaver turned into a spider by Athena, Medusa, and perhaps even ascended Gods, like Dionisus, Hercules or the Nordic Baldur


Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Lets suppose such Fae were still fertile...with us. All of a sudden a lot of the stories about the fickle, unpredictable nature of the Fae in their romantic relationships with us might begin to make some sense...
Yep, that would create a Changelling. I still wanna the Fae being able to come to be as Firstborns and Inanimes thou, but those two "races" need not to come from reproduction... Actually, ideas are apreciated on that regard, thanks


Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Another way Fae could be profoundly alien to us: suppose they are immortal. I mean literally immortal, all the way unkillable. Their supernatural nature might mean that even if you vaporize a Sidhe, it'll reform over time and return. In that way they might be a little like Tolkien's Ainur (and indeed, in some versions of his mythology, the Sidhe are extremely minor Ainur).

So you've got a superficially human-like creature who cannot be permanently destroyed. They might still feel pain and behave superficially like us. They might try to avoid being shot or stabbed or immolated, because that hurts, but at the same time, they know they will survive whatever is about to be done to them, no matter what. Even if you tie one to a 20 megaton nuke and fire it off, he'll return in a few days or years or whatever.

Flip side of that: forms of death that are quick and painless might hold little terror to them, it's just an inconvenience at most, after all. So you get the legendary Sidhe indifference to danger. Alvion the Fairie Lord might think nothing of driving stealing a souped-up racer, driving it up the one-lane mountain road at 120 mph, swerving half off the road near a cliff to avoid oncoming traffic, and so on...because what's the worst that could happen?

Here too we get the notorious Sidhe unpredictability. Creatures immune to death might well not be all that empathetic to others in that regard. The Sidhe might casually engage in lethal violence with each other, since the outcome is temporary. They might also not be able to comprehend the human dread of and respect for death, either...
I loved that, and I'll use it. With just a little extra: to die and ressurect hurts A LOT. So, Fae gets REALLY mad when they are killed; mortals can expect the Faes at their worse after killing one of the Fair Folk. Ocasionally, one Fae may imprision another in a death trap (insine of a Vulcano, for example). Only the most hateful of the enemies do that, because all Fae knows that their rival will be free - someday. And, after eons being killed over and over... Oh boy, I guess you can imagine it. (not just that, since in this version of mine, Fae are creatures of Fate, when one Fae escapes its death prison, is because Fate decided so... And since Fate is pushing this Fae, it will give a big push... Which could mean something like 1000 points to remove disadvantages - or, even better, the trapped Fae spends the time imprisoned using its Temporary Impulse Points creating knew powers for itself, slowly cooking its spite against its enemy, all disadvantages incurred being washed away by destiny). That means that, doing this to a hated foe, means only that it will one day get free much more powerful than before, to get revenge.

Thats also one of the WORSE things that mortals do when dealing with troublesome Fair Folk that can't be destroyed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
When you're going to be in this world until the End, Time becomes kind of an abstraction, too. Here we get the notorious danger of time warping. Sidhe might not understand why imprisoning a human for 100 years in a time warp is so dire a deed. "What's he so upset about. I was locked in the crystal cage for a 1000 years when I lost the Great Game, he's only been trapped for 50 years..."

Of course to that mortal, 50 years is time enough for his wife to die of old age, his children to grow up and have children of their own and maybe grandkids, for his home town and home country to change substantially, his friends to be gone, his house long since torn down and replaced by a other things, etc.

Sidhe society might not change recognizably in centuries or millennia, human societies are not so stable. The Sidhe might not even mean any harm when they take actions that throw a human decades or centuries out of his time...
I'll add a little bit to this: Faery lands work in a different time than us. In the faeric worlds (which I'll make as a kind of spiritual world/other dimension), one night may mean centuries in the human world (and vice versa).

Also, time can flow backwards. I human partying with the Fae one night, could return in the time of the dinossaurs!

Those time shifts are always related to FATE thou; so, the human that return 50 years later, do that for a reason, that only destiny knows.

A Fae PC could go out of its castle searching for a human baby to kidnap, so he enters the mortal world at the XXV century, takes a box from the room and puts the baby in, returns to its castle to place a bless on the baby, and go back to the mortal world to leave the baby with a mortal family. That box from XXV century however, have a holodisc with the tale of King Arthur; when the baby reaches the age of 5, the hologram tells the child the tale. The yong Merlim goes out in a quest.

When the Fae that picked the baby Merlim from the future returns once again to the human world, he returns to help Merlim fight off Morgana Le Fey and the Queen Mab
KarlKost is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Fnords are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.