Steve Jackson Games - Site Navigation
Home General Info Follow Us Search Illuminator Store Forums What's New Other Games Ogre GURPS Munchkin Our Games: Home

Go Back   Steve Jackson Games Forums > Roleplaying > Roleplaying in General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-11-2015, 05:39 PM   #871
Flyndaran
Untagged
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Forest Grove, Beaverton, Oregon
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
During the peace negotiations between Sweden and Denmark 1613, both kings were banned from attending. They had sabotaged previous peace negotiations. However, they both attended anyway - in disguise.
I mean this with all the kindness imaginable, but your countries up there have some of the funniest odd instances of history.
__________________
Beware, poor communication skills. No offense intended. If offended, it just means that I failed my writing skill check.
Flyndaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2015, 03:48 AM   #872
Anders
 
Anders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by ericthered View Post
nice ... can I get a link?
I don't think I have a link in English. It was in 1611, during the so-called Kalmar War. Swedish historians don't want to talk about it because we clearly lost.

The previous "peace negotiations" had been handled by the kings. King Charles IX of Sweden had opened them by challenging the Danish king to a duel "in the old Geatish way", with only a helmet for protection.

Christian IV answered by saying that the Swedish king was better suited for pity than for a fight, that a warm fire would be better for the old king, and that he needed a doctor to "make [his] head right again". He finished his note by saying that the Charles had apparently learned his manners from a whore who "wards herself by barking".

There was no peace.

Edit: Note that this wasn't even the lowest point of Swedish diplomacy. That took place in an infamous exchange of letters between John III and Ivan IV in 1572-1573, where the czar claimed that John was the son of a lowly peasant and that the czar was as the Heavens to John's lowly Earth. Upon reading this, John III completely lost it and sent a letter in which he said a) that the czar must have been raised by a peasant or a monk since he does not know how to write to a king; b) that John's father was a powerful noble and gave a very extensive account for his noble heritage; and c) that the czar had so poisoned his mouth with lies that it could never be clean again. He then wishes that the czar be reduced to a thrall, says that all Russians are ignoble thralls as well, and says that if the czar trembles over his letter and wishes to make peace, John will magnamoniously grant it, if the czar send his highest nobles to treat with the Swedish king.
__________________
"Someone despises me? That is his concern. But I will see to it that I am not guilty of any word or action deserving contempt, Will he hate me? That is his concern. But I will be kind and well-intentioned to all, and ready to show this very person what he is failing to see - not with any criticism or display of tolerance, but with genuine good will..." Marcus Aurelius

Last edited by Anders; 02-12-2015 at 10:20 AM.
Anders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2015, 08:55 PM   #873
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
During the peace negotiations between Sweden and Denmark 1613, both kings were banned from attending. They had sabotaged previous peace negotiations. However, they both attended anyway - in disguise.
Who did the banning? Who did the monarchs have to answer in those days?
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2015, 02:37 AM   #874
Nereidalbel
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Ellicott City, MD
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Who did the banning? Who did the monarchs have to answer in those days?
Either religious authority, or generals promising a coup if they interfered.
Nereidalbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2015, 03:46 AM   #875
Anders
 
Anders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Who did the banning? Who did the monarchs have to answer in those days?
The Swedish Privy Council (Marshal, Admiral, Treasurer, Chancellor and Chief Justice). This was before the advent of absolute monarchy. Charles IX had died from a stroke soon after the exchange of notes, so the Swedish throne was occupied by Gustav II Adolf (age 19; and there hadn't been a formal coronation ceremony yet; that had to wait until 1617). The Swedish king was fairly powerful - Charles IX had beheaded most of the top nobles in order to take control of the country - but Christian IV's ability to do what he wanted was sharply restricted by constitutional means. IIRC, the war wasn't officially between the King of Denmark and Sweden, but actually between the Count of Holstein-Gottorp and Sweden, and Christian IV had to pay for everything himself. Peter or Hans may know more. Absolute monarchs didn't become a thing until the second half of the 17th century.

The Swedish king was dependent on the Riksdag of the Estates for foreign policy, be able to conscript soldiers and take out extra taxes for wars.

Edit edit: Having consulted with the history professor who gave the lesson I heard on this, he says that while the Privy Council couldn't absolutely ban the kings from attending, they could tell them in very strong terms that it would be unwise and beneath the kings to attend. And you can probably find stories like these about most 15th-16th-17th century monarchies - it's just that I happen to love history and read voraciously. And Sweden is relatively unaffected by patriotism, so we don't hide embarassing events like these. For instance, did you know that England had a king who believed he was made of glass?
__________________
"Someone despises me? That is his concern. But I will see to it that I am not guilty of any word or action deserving contempt, Will he hate me? That is his concern. But I will be kind and well-intentioned to all, and ready to show this very person what he is failing to see - not with any criticism or display of tolerance, but with genuine good will..." Marcus Aurelius

Last edited by Anders; 02-14-2015 at 12:30 PM.
Anders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2015, 01:30 AM   #876
Daigoro
 
Daigoro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Meifumado
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daigoro View Post
If you can't see adventure possibilities in an underground stolen self-mummified monk smuggling ring, perhaps you've taken up the wrong hobby...
Mummified monk is ‘not dead’ and in rare meditative state, says expert

And something about the Mummies of Yamagata
The Gruesome and Excruciating Practice of Mummifying Your Own Body

And the Chinese-Arabian Honey Mummy
Mellified Man
More in the same vein:
CT Scan of 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue Reveals Mummified Monk Hidden Inside
__________________
World Wikis:
Cyberpunk: Duopoly Nation
Fantasy: Dominion Cross
Space Opera: Behind the King's Eclipse
Steampunk: Colonial Steam
Daigoro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2015, 02:21 AM   #877
David Johnston2
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nereidalbel View Post
For instance, did you know that England had a king who believed he was made of glass?
I'm pretty sure they didn't since I recall Charles VI of France having that exact delusion. I know of him because of Bal des Ardents, an object lesson in not playing with fire.
David Johnston2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2015, 02:28 AM   #878
Anders
 
Anders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Right. Charles VI, sorry about that. I was thinking of Henry VI, who was also insane.
__________________
"Someone despises me? That is his concern. But I will see to it that I am not guilty of any word or action deserving contempt, Will he hate me? That is his concern. But I will be kind and well-intentioned to all, and ready to show this very person what he is failing to see - not with any criticism or display of tolerance, but with genuine good will..." Marcus Aurelius
Anders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2015, 05:12 AM   #879
RogerBW
 
RogerBW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: near London, UK
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
Right. Charles VI, sorry about that. I was thinking of Henry VI, who was also insane.
The glass delusion (see Wikipedia) was quite a common form of madness in that period. It seems to have gone out of the zeitgeist now. As parodied by Bujold (Brothers in Arms):

"The fifth Countess Vorkosigan was said to suffer from the periodic delusion that she was made of glass."
"What finally happened to her?" asked Elli in a tone of fascination.
"One of her irritated relations eventually dropped and broke her."
"The delusion was that intense?"
"It was off a twenty-meter-tall turret."
RogerBW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2015, 05:11 PM   #880
stefanj
 
stefanj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Beaverton, OR
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

OMFG I love stuff like this:

"I assume the women were MTA employees, but definitely not track workers. Or at least, not dressed to do track work. They were both middle aged and looked like commuters. We were in the first car. They came through the car from behind and made their way to the front. We hardly noticed since so many people move to the front on the G.

A few minutes after, the train stopped. We realized that they were talking to the conductor, who had come out of his area. Everyone was pretty quiet. I think we all thought something bad was happening. It was so unusual for the train to stop and the conductor to be in the car.



So then, the conductor comes to one of the center doors, he unlocks one of the poster cases next to the doors of the train and reveals this mechanical area. At this point, everyone I was with was super tense. It seemed like there must be some sort of emergency, so it was super quiet on the train. Anyway, he just pulls the lever, opens the door and the women step out onto this concrete platform. I didn't see this, but my co-worker David Reilly says that there was some sort of room on the platform with frosted windows with bars on them ."

Full Story:

http://gothamist.com/2015/02/25/secr...ortal_whoa.php

Somewhere in a room full of robed figures a man carrying a white cat is cursing and shouting "We've been compromised. Evacuate this facility. And see that the mind-wipe team on duty that night never has a chance to fail us again."

(Growing up on LI, I heard stories about other Subway oddities, like a heavily guarded flatbed subway car that once made pick-ups of sacks of tokens from the stations at night.)
__________________
Alphabet Arcane / MacGuffin Alphabet / Unnight
Twitter: StefanEJones
stefanj is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Fnords are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.