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Old 08-30-2019, 01:46 PM   #21
tomc
 
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Default Re: Outdoor adventure cards?

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Originally Posted by philreed View Post
That is how I would handle it. If I wanted to manipulate a deck, as a designer, I would include multiple instances of the same card in the deck.
If you're replacing tables with decks of cards it can get out of hand quickly if you add a card for each combination of dice on a one to one basis.

For instance: a 3d6 table will have only 16 entries (3 through 18), but represent 216 (6x6x6) combinations of dice. So to perfectly preserve the bell curve you get from rolling dice, you'll need a deck of 216 cards to draw from, with many duplicates so the odds of drawing each result remain the same. This many cards might make your game too expensive to print.

You can mitigate this by using fewer cards for each combination, in effect flattening the bell curve. This will make the less likely items come up more often, but perhaps make things more exciting.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:13 PM   #22
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Default Re: Outdoor adventure cards?

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Originally Posted by tomc View Post
If you're replacing tables with decks of cards it can get out of hand quickly if you add a card for each combination of dice on a one to one basis.

For instance: a 3d6 table will have only 16 entries (3 through 18), but represent 216 (6x6x6) combinations of dice. So to perfectly preserve the bell curve you get from rolling dice, you'll need a deck of 216 cards to draw from, with many duplicates so the odds of drawing each result remain the same. This many cards might make your game too expensive to print.

You can mitigate this by using fewer cards for each combination, in effect flattening the bell curve. This will make the less likely items come up more often, but perhaps make things more exciting.
Since I bought the decks through the kickstarter (before they went mainstream...), I have the PDFs and can print them as desired and put them in opaque backed card covers. Using this concept you could easily weight the deck in any way you want. You could even create a deck for special occasions.
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:08 PM   #23
Skarg
 
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Default Re: Outdoor adventure cards?

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Originally Posted by Chris Rice View Post
Split the Deck into two or more piles depending on the desired frequency/likelihood. Then roll a dice:

2 piles: 1-4 likely pile. 5-6 less likely pile.
3 piles: 1-3 likely pile, 3-5 less likely pile, 6 unlikely pile.

Something like that.
This seems like the most practical way to do it, unless you can print as many cards as you want to match the odds you want.

I'm not about to try to use cards to replace encounter type tables (which are much more compact and transparent, and I'm not great at shuffling).

However, the type of combination table/cards Chris mentions is like many detailed encounter tables I made starting with TFT circa 1983. That is, they used something like a 4d6 table, and then each line often had sub-chances that were often linear. That way I could have common types of encounter in the middle range, rare things on the ends, and the rarest things be near the ends and also be only one of the things that can happen for that roll. That would be very similar to having a weighted table map to different card mixes as Chris suggests.
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Old 09-04-2019, 05:30 PM   #24
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Default Re: Outdoor adventure cards?

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Originally Posted by Skarg View Post
This seems like the most practical way to do it, unless you can print as many cards as you want to match the odds you want.

I'm not about to try to use cards to replace encounter type tables (which are much more compact and transparent, and I'm not great at shuffling).

However, the type of combination table/cards Chris mentions is like many detailed encounter tables I made starting with TFT circa 1983. That is, they used something like a 4d6 table, and then each line often had sub-chances that were often linear. That way I could have common types of encounter in the middle range, rare things on the ends, and the rarest things be near the ends and also be only one of the things that can happen for that roll. That would be very similar to having a weighted table map to different card mixes as Chris suggests.
I had a huge table driven dungeon generator that used 30 or so tables, mostly 3d6 or 4d6. It felt tedious pretty quickly, as the average rolls kept coming up, and the interesting things were off on the edges of the tables. It helped when I started checking things off the chart when they were first rolled, and using an adjacent unused value the second time.

But it flowed much better when I converted the tables to decks of cards. Cards took up less space, it was faster to draw a card than to roll and look up on a table, and I could just discard a card when I was done so it wouldn't come up again. And as mentioned, you have precise control of the odds with a deck of cards, and you aren't bound by the faces on a die. You can have 15 cards in a deck, or 237, populated exactly as you like.
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Old 09-06-2019, 09:54 PM   #25
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Default Re: Outdoor adventure cards?

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Originally Posted by tomc View Post
I had a huge table driven dungeon generator that used 30 or so tables, mostly 3d6 or 4d6. It felt tedious pretty quickly, as the average rolls kept coming up, and the interesting things were off on the edges of the tables. It helped when I started checking things off the chart when they were first rolled, and using an adjacent unused value the second time.

But it flowed much better when I converted the tables to decks of cards. Cards took up less space, it was faster to draw a card than to roll and look up on a table, and I could just discard a card when I was done so it wouldn't come up again. And as mentioned, you have precise control of the odds with a deck of cards, and you aren't bound by the faces on a die. You can have 15 cards in a deck, or 237, populated exactly as you like.
Wow! That's pretty complex. The only way I managed to do that was by using Inspiration Pad Pro (by NBOS). With that I could build hugely complex, interdependent tables that would generate entire galaxies if I wanted them to...
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