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Old 03-23-2021, 11:05 PM   #31
Polydamas
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Default Re: Real life hangers on at Renaissance royal courts?

There are also the equivalent of lobbyists: people who want something from the prince, and are hanging around until he or someone important says yes. Depending on the lobbyist's status, that might involve going to parties, or it might involve sitting in lobbies and paying bribes to door-keepers and secretaries.

There are all the people associated with the prince's duties to heaven (which depending on culture and temperament might include people to transport a portable chapel, or flocks of beggar monks, or a really clever philosopher).

There are people who claim to have secret learning which lets them predict the future, whether they call themselves economists, readers of bird-signs, or astrologers.

There are ever more specific types of servants: have you really lived until you have separate teams of mounted falconers and foot falconers? Who are different from the boys of the leash who guide your packs of hunting hounds, or the people who tend your ponds of eels.

There are people to educate the children at court.

One of the Arab manuals specifically recommends finding someone who is cheerful and agreeable and never asks the prince for anything important.

In England some of the major departments were the pantry, buttery, wardrobe, exchequer, tailor, armourer, chapel, all the trades to do with hunting, all the trades to do with hauling the above around as the court migrates ...

Check out the section on courts at your local library and there should be something. Lots of people in the USA like the courts of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I of England. There is also Pepys' diary from the 17th century.
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Last edited by Polydamas; 03-23-2021 at 11:14 PM.
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Old 03-24-2021, 10:43 AM   #32
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Default Re: Real life hangers on at Renaissance royal courts?

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Originally Posted by Polydamas View Post
There are also the equivalent of lobbyists: people who want something from the prince, and are hanging around until he or someone important says yes. Depending on the lobbyist's status, that might involve going to parties, or it might involve sitting in lobbies and paying bribes to door-keepers and secretaries.

There are all the people associated with the prince's duties to heaven (which depending on culture and temperament might include people to transport a portable chapel, or flocks of beggar monks, or a really clever philosopher).

There are people who claim to have secret learning which lets them predict the future, whether they call themselves economists, readers of bird-signs, or astrologers.

There are ever more specific types of servants: have you really lived until you have separate teams of mounted falconers and foot falconers? Who are different from the boys of the leash who guide your packs of hunting hounds, or the people who tend your ponds of eels.

There are people to educate the children at court.

One of the Arab manuals specifically recommends finding someone who is cheerful and agreeable and never asks the prince for anything important.

In England some of the major departments were the pantry, buttery, wardrobe, exchequer, tailor, armourer, chapel, all the trades to do with hunting, all the trades to do with hauling the above around as the court migrates ...

Check out the section on courts at your local library and there should be something. Lots of people in the USA like the courts of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I of England. There is also Pepys' diary from the 17th century.
I wonder how many come from the Prince's actual interest and how many from jostling at a lower level. Does the difference between mounted and foot falconers reflect the sovereign's true desires or guild politics?
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Old 03-24-2021, 12:11 PM   #33
Polydamas
 
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Default Re: Real life hangers on at Renaissance royal courts?

I don't know why, but Edward III of England had both in the 1340s when he was not a rich prince. Henry VIII of England had leashboys (or some similar title for the people who lead a pack of hunting dogs).

Another category is friends and relations who are visiting. This might be purely social, they or their host might want something, or they may be looking for free food and entertainment. Inviting yourself to stay with someone was also an excellent way to interrupt any plotting and eat and drink up resources which they had been planning to use for something else. Many cultures have customs which make it awkward to refuse hospitality to friends and relations (and refusing it to someone higher in station can have immediate consequences!)

Oh, and people involved in the administration and enforcement of justice! Edward III had three or four hangmen, and most courts will have someone who is knowledgeable about the law and someone to keep and sort through records for them. Rich and powerful people get involved in legal disputes!
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Last edited by Polydamas; 03-24-2021 at 12:17 PM.
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Old 03-24-2021, 05:10 PM   #34
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Default Re: Real life hangers on at Renaissance royal courts?

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Originally Posted by Polydamas View Post
I don't know why, but Edward III of England had both in the 1340s when he was not a rich prince. Henry VIII of England had leashboys (or some similar title for the people who lead a pack of hunting dogs).

Another category is friends and relations who are visiting. This might be purely social, they or their host might want something, or they may be looking for free food and entertainment. Inviting yourself to stay with someone was also an excellent way to interrupt any plotting and eat and drink up resources which they had been planning to use for something else. Many cultures have customs which make it awkward to refuse hospitality to friends and relations (and refusing it to someone higher in station can have immediate consequences!)

Oh, and people involved in the administration and enforcement of justice! Edward III had three or four hangmen, and most courts will have someone who is knowledgeable about the law and someone to keep and sort through records for them. Rich and powerful people get involved in legal disputes!
https://thedunvegan.com/what-to-do/macleods-tables/
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