Steve Jackson Games - Site Navigation
Home General Info Follow Us Search Illuminator Store Forums What's New Other Games Ogre GURPS Munchkin Our Games: Home

Go Back   Steve Jackson Games Forums > Roleplaying > Roleplaying in General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-05-2017, 09:07 PM   #1761
Anaraxes
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Not weird, but at least in the gaming-related category of "new materials with perhaps dubious popular reporting of properties" category: an alloy of titanium and gold that's said to be 3-4x harder than most steels, four times harder than pure titanium.

This one seems appealing to me not just as near-future tech for cyborg implants and street samurai, but also as technobabble for a fantasy game, justification for those awesome legendary weapons from ages past made with lost techniques, or armament for your cold-iron-shy fae warriors, for whom money is no object. Titanium is of course already a magic- or alchemy-invoking stretch for faux-medieval tech, but what could be better for DF than actually making your weapons out of gold? Maybe you can even make your After The End gold bugs happy if there's an actual in-setting reason the zombie-fighting warlords do want their non-edible shiny yellow luxury metal.
Anaraxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 09:56 PM   #1762
tshiggins
 
tshiggins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Denver, Colorado
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaraxes View Post
Not weird, but at least in the gaming-related category of "new materials with perhaps dubious popular reporting of properties" category: an alloy of titanium and gold that's said to be 3-4x harder than most steels, four times harder than pure titanium.

This one seems appealing to me not just as near-future tech for cyborg implants and street samurai, but also as technobabble for a fantasy game, justification for those awesome legendary weapons from ages past made with lost techniques, or armament for your cold-iron-shy fae warriors, for whom money is no object. Titanium is of course already a magic- or alchemy-invoking stretch for faux-medieval tech, but what could be better for DF than actually making your weapons out of gold? Maybe you can even make your After The End gold bugs happy if there's an actual in-setting reason the zombie-fighting warlords do want their non-edible shiny yellow luxury metal.
It doesn't say how much it masses, as compared to steel, though. A broadsword that weighs 10 lbs is not that useful, no matter how hard it is.

Great notion to use it for medical purposes, though. Maybe I can get some really good replacement knees, someday. :)
__________________
--
MXLP:8 [JD=1, DK=1, DM-M=1, M(FAW)=1, SS=2, Nym=1 (nose coffee), sj=1 (nose cocoa)]
"Some days, I just don't know what to think." -Daryl Dixon.

Last edited by tshiggins; 11-05-2017 at 10:01 PM.
tshiggins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 10:00 PM   #1763
Flyndaran
Untagged
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Forest Grove, Beaverton, Oregon
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

You just need to layer it over regular iron as you don't need super hardness throughout a weapon. I think it's even bad to do so as it would make it all too brittle.
I do wish they would remember that there are people allergic to gold. My mom develops rashes. Fortunately she's too cheap to ever want any anyway. Ha.
__________________
Beware, poor communication skills. No offense intended. If offended, it just means that I failed my writing skill check.
Flyndaran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2017, 12:36 PM   #1764
Anaraxes
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by tshiggins View Post
It doesn't say how much it masses, as compared to steel, though.
There's a chart in the paper which shows the peak hardness at about 7.5 g /cm^3, so pretty close to steel. It's a 3:1 ratio of Ti to Au, so that no doubt lightens it a good bit.

Quote:
Great notion to use it for medical purposes, though. Maybe I can get some really good replacement knees, someday. :)
Also an improved coefficient of friction, apparently, so smoother operation and less wear.

Last edited by Anaraxes; 11-06-2017 at 12:39 PM.
Anaraxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2017, 08:28 PM   #1765
Johnny1A.2
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaraxes View Post
Not weird, but at least in the gaming-related category of "new materials with perhaps dubious popular reporting of properties" category: an alloy of titanium and gold that's said to be 3-4x harder than most steels, four times harder than pure titanium.

This one seems appealing to me not just as near-future tech for cyborg implants and street samurai, but also as technobabble for a fantasy game, justification for those awesome legendary weapons from ages past made with lost techniques, or armament for your cold-iron-shy fae warriors, for whom money is no object. Titanium is of course already a magic- or alchemy-invoking stretch for faux-medieval tech, but what could be better for DF than actually making your weapons out of gold? Maybe you can even make your After The End gold bugs happy if there's an actual in-setting reason the zombie-fighting warlords do want their non-edible shiny yellow luxury metal.
Am I the only one who suddenly hears the voice of Tony Stark telling JARVIS to use the 'gold titanium alloy from the seraphim tactical satellite"?
__________________
HMS Overflow-For conversations off topic here.
Johnny1A.2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 01:11 PM   #1766
William
 
William's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Heard about this dude recently. Another real-life PC, this one in the "infidel foreign mercenary carves out own kingdom" genre:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
George Thomas, nicknamed Jaharai Jung and Jahazi Sahib, (c. 1756 in Roscrea, Tipperary, Ireland 22 August 1802 in Berhampur, West Bengal, India) was an Irish mercenary and later a Raja who was active in 18th-century India. From 1798 to 1801, he ruled a small kingdom in India, which he carved out of Hisar and Rohtak districts of Haryana.
William is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 04:42 PM   #1767
Phase_Shifter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Florence, AL
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyndaran View Post
You just need to layer it over regular iron as you don't need super hardness throughout a weapon. I think it's even bad to do so as it would make it all too brittle.
I do wish they would remember that there are people allergic to gold. My mom develops rashes. Fortunately, she's too cheap to ever want any anyway. Ha.
Maybe this means you can use gold to case-harden ordinary titanium--just plate the surface with gold, then heat-treat to produce the new alloy.

As for allergies to gold--hopefully, the alloy should reduce the activities of both gold and titanium, since both are diluted by mixing.

I recall hearing someone researching artificial joint materials saying that roughly 25% of the population has problems with titanium implants becoming pitted over time, which causes problems with roughening of surfaces in artificial joints. (At the time, the major issue was that a pitted titanium ball in a ball-and-socket joint would shave out bits of the plastic socket, so people were researching diamondlike carbon coatings for the titanium.)

Last edited by Phase_Shifter; 11-15-2017 at 04:48 PM.
Phase_Shifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 04:44 PM   #1768
Phase_Shifter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Florence, AL
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny1A.2 View Post
Am I the only one who suddenly hears the voice of Tony Stark telling JARVIS to use the 'gold titanium alloy from the seraphim tactical satellite"?
The same thing ran through my head as I read about this.
Phase_Shifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2017, 06:56 PM   #1769
David Johnston2
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

Between 1966 and 1993, the British Telecom building, one of the tallest buildings in London, was officially a state secret. It was transmitting television signals all over the country but also incidentally military traffic. Government maps omitted it, and in theory someone could be prosecuted for taking photographs of it, even though it frequently appeared on popular television shows including an episode of Doctor Who. Finally its cover was blown in 1993 when a member of Parliament said these momentous words:

I hope that I am covered by parliamentary privilege when I reveal that the British Telecom tower does exist and that its address is 60 Cleveland Street, London.

The British public was shocked and amazed that it had ever been a secret. I am reminded of the Watchtowers from Creatures of the Night.
David Johnston2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2017, 10:00 PM   #1770
William
 
William's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Upper Peninsula of Michigan
Default Re: Real-Life Weirdness

The Jerusalem neighborhood of Kufr Aqab or Kafr 'Aqab is a Kowloon-like neighborhood that could be useful as a game setting, especially if you let the politics ferment a bit. It lies within the municipal boundaries of Jerusalem and residents pay city taxes, but for convoluted geographic reasons it lies outside the Israeli barrier wall and receives very few city services -- including building inspections and fire and police protection, due to fears of attacks on city personnel.

Rents are quite low, especially since much of the land is of dubious title: to quote the New York Times, "Hundreds of apartment buildings went up, sometimes on purchased plots, sometimes on vacant lots that strong-arm characters claimed and dared anyone to evict them from. Concrete towers sprouted like weeds, often separated by only a few feet." That should put anyone in mind of Kowloon Walled City.

So should this phrase: '"What you see is a total governance vacuum," said Danny Seidemann, a lawyer and founder of Terrestrial Jerusalem, an advocacy group that tracks contentious developments in the city. "We can't even count the number of people there."'

For another dose of cosmopolitanism, mixed Israeli-Palestinian couples often choose to live there since the Israeli partner can retain Jerusalem residency while the Palestinian partner can live with them without needing a permit to cross the border wall. So odd types can maybe come and go without as much notice or comment.
William is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Fnords are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.