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Old 09-05-2014, 03:12 PM   #11
sir_pudding
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Default Re: Madness Dossier in the 1920s

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Originally Posted by MaddCow View Post
Are you referring to the stress portion where it wears off after a set amount of 'relaxation' time?
Yes, and also the rules on GURPS Horror pp. 144-145 for Cures and Therapy for removing permanent disadvantages from fright checks and derangements.
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Old 09-05-2014, 04:32 PM   #12
MaddCow
 
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Default Re: Madness Dossier in the 1920s

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Yes, and also the rules on GURPS Horror pp. 144-145 for Cures and Therapy for removing permanent disadvantages from fright checks and derangements.
Ya, I saw those as well. I haven't used them in a campaign yet, but eager to try.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:46 PM   #13
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Default Re: Madness Dossier in the 1920s

One advantage PCs can have in the 20s is government is more personal and trusted by the people that matter. So a character with the right social advantages approaching the captain of a warship can get a landing party to help. And if things go bad and the ship ends up shelling a cult compound the papers will just follow the government more on what happened.
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:41 PM   #14
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One advantage PCs can have in the 20s is government is more personal and trusted by the people that matter. So a character with the right social advantages approaching the captain of a warship can get a landing party to help. And if things go bad and the ship ends up shelling a cult compound the papers will just follow the government more on what happened.
This is true. There was definitely a lot more solidarity and union among people. I guess that would be able to play into the PCs hands. Also, things might seem a lot more horrific than they might appear just because public awareness about a lot of things hasn't really taken off just yet.
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Old 09-06-2014, 01:45 PM   #15
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government is more personal and trusted by the people that matter.
Teapot Dome. Eugene Debs. Tammany Hall. Al Capone. Charles Becker. "War is a Racket".
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Old 09-06-2014, 01:49 PM   #16
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Default Re: Madness Dossier in the 1920s

I'm not sure that the '20s was a time of general social unity. Actually, you could as easily call it an age of uncertainty and fragmentation, with multiple radical and revolutionary movements in almost every country, the rise of Communism and Fascism, and the psychological effects of the Great War still percolating down through societies.

What you did have was, perhaps, a greater sense of reflexive unity within the social and political establishment, with the mass media still mostly seeing themselves as being inside the fortress and on the same side as the ruling classes - along with a persistent habit of Victorian-style deference among some parts of society. The idea that "they" surely knew best wasn't universal, but nor was it seen as automatically risible.

Which your proto-Sandmen can definitely exploit.
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Old 09-06-2014, 02:23 PM   #17
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I'm not sure that the '20s was a time of general social unity. Actually, you could as easily call it an age of uncertainty and fragmentation, with multiple radical and revolutionary movements in almost every country, the rise of Communism and Fascism, and the psychological effects of the Great War still percolating down through societies.

What you did have was, perhaps, a greater sense of reflexive unity within the social and political establishment, with the mass media still mostly seeing themselves as being inside the fortress and on the same side as the ruling classes - along with a persistent habit of Victorian-style deference among some parts of society. The idea that "they" surely knew best wasn't universal, but nor was it seen as automatically risible.

Which your proto-Sandmen can definitely exploit.
Great points. Thanks for all the info Phil, definitely helps me with regards to how I'd like for things to go, or at least where to start :)

Cheers!
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:11 AM   #18
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Default Re: Madness Dossier in the 1920s

With regards to point totals, (Not including any pseudo pre-sandman patron/skills/abilities) what do you think the base point values for characters should be? 150-200? 250? This is of course without any of the additional 'Sandman' extras that you would normally have access to.
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